JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for POETRYETC Archives


POETRYETC Archives

POETRYETC Archives


POETRYETC@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

POETRYETC Home

POETRYETC Home

POETRYETC  2003

POETRYETC 2003

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

A smattering of chattering

From:

Jon Corelis <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Poetryetc provides a venue for a dialogue relating to poetry and poetics <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 8 Jun 2003 09:17:10 -0700

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (102 lines)

I'm glad that my comments on satire occasioned some dialog.  I see in 
retrospect that I didn't correctly phrase my question about whether an 
effective satire has been written in the last half century.  What I was 
thinking was whether in that time any poem which is clearly a satire had 
been written which is now recognized as a major poem by its regular 
inclusion in anthologies and class syllabi (and yes I know there are all 
sorts of things wrong with using that as a standard as well as with the 
whole idea of a canon but that's a separate issue.)  By this standard at 
least it seems arguable that the second half of the 20th century won't be 
remembered as a great age of satire.  As for the poems which have been 
mentioned, "Gunslinger" is a recognized major poem (which I admire), though 
I'd say it had satiric elements rather than being a satire.  But I suppose 
it can be one answer to my question.  A clearer answer is a famous poem 
which I know and like but which had escaped my memory:  Ginsberg's 
"America," definitely a satire of a very traditional type in its content (as 
opposed to its diction and technique) which being from 1956 squeaks in.  
Incidentally, if you listen to a recording of Ginsberg reading that piece 
you'll realize how close it is to being a stand-up comic routine.   Auden's 
"Under Which Lyre" is a very deliberately traditional satire in the manner 
of "Hudibras" (which I suspect it's purposely emulating,) but it's from 
1946. “Under Which Lyre,” incidentally is an example of a good poem which I 
loathe:  in its smug ingrown academicism, it marks  for me the beginning of 
American poetry's transformation into an academic discipline, i.e. its utter 
destruction.

==================================================
Robin Hamilton's Anacreontea are excellent and I’m glad to hear they’re 
being published. The Greek Anthology pieces are also worthy though not as 
good in my opinion.  I think he should have gone farther with the hair color 
poem.  Why not have the piece concentrate on more extensively traversing the 
whole rainbow of weird hair colors you might see today walking around 
someplace like Islington?  That would be a clever change to ring on the 
original.

The best of the traditional translations (i.e. those trying to bring across 
the tone of the originals rather than recreating them in a modern 
consciousness) of the Anacreontea which I know of in English are those by 
Thomas Moore, who seems suited by termperament to render them well.  Some of 
them are available on the internet at:

             http://www.geocities.com/~bblair/moore_anacreon.htm

(And a reminder for anyone interested that my own translations of a few 
Anacreontea are on my web site.)

There may be an opportunity for an anthology of various translations of 
Anacreon, including both traditional ones like Moore’s and recreations like 
Robin Hamilton’s

==================================================
I was surprised to find the Moore Anacreontea on the net, but I suppose 
everything will be there eventually.   Has anyone else noticed that people 
are more likely to read your  poetry if you put it on a web page?  When I 
tell acquaintances I now have a literary web site, they usually say, “I’ll 
have to look at that,” and sometimes they do.  But I’m sure that if I told 
these same people, “I have a poem in my pocket, want to hear it?” and 
started to pull it out, they’d edge away mumbling “Maybe later …”

==================================================
Idle comment:   when I read

     “writing which concerns itself with the mundanity of the everyday, 
which speaks about life, fertility,
       childbirth, change”

what immediately occurred to me was what a good description this is of 
Joyce’s Ulysses.

==================================================
Recently I posted here an announcement of a new art and literature 
(including poetry) magazine, The International Review of Erotica.  I've been 
informed that their first issue has appeared and is described on their web 
site at:

                                       www.DiversePublications.co.uk


==================================================
Thanks to Anny Ballardini for her appreciate of my poem “A day,” and I join 
in welcoming her back.

==================================================
Quote of the week:


                       A man must serve his time to every trade
                       Save censure – critics all are ready made.

                                                             -- Byron


==================================================

Jon Corelis        [log in to unmask]        
http://www.geocities.com/joncpoetics

==================================================

_________________________________________________________________
Help STOP SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE*  
http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager