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Subject:

Widewater

From:

Andy Horton <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Andy Horton <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 8 Aug 2002 06:44:38 -0400

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Hello,

Widewater:  brackish water lagoon with percolated seawater
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/BMLSS/brackish.htm

9 July 2002 
Live small cockles (new recruits of a breeding population) have now been
discovered at depths of 20 cm in Widewater, which was about a metre deep
near the bridge. This is the Lagoon Cockle, Cerastoderma glaucum, although
when the cockles are small (12 mm width) they do not have the shape of the
full grown ones, so they initially looked to me like Common Cockles,
Cerastoderma edule. Actually, whilst they are alive there does not seem to
be an easy way to distinguish them as it is the interior groove differences
that are diagnostic. The shell is thinner and the Lagoon Cockle is brittler
and the live shell can be easily prised open with a fingernail which is
much harder with the Common Cockle, even small ones. The Shore Crab,
Carcinus maenas, would find these shells very easy to crack open.  
BMLSS Cockles 
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/BMLSS/cockles.htm

The black ooze (mud substrate) also revealed Nereis (ragworms), lugworms
and other assorted worms. The tiny gastropod Hydrobia was plentiful as
expected. There were also a few sediment-dwelling attachment type sea
anemones discovered, although these were not Edwardsia ivelli.  

Report by Dan Metcalfe (University of Brighton)

The miniature sea anemones have been identified as a dwarf specimens of the
distinctive Haliplanella lineata with orange stripes which are not found on
other British sea anemones. The anemone photographed was only 2 mm in
height and 3 mm in diameter and this was typical of the dozen anemones
discovered.  
Report by Dan Metcalfe (University of Brighton)
This alien anemone (accidentally introduced species) is a sea anemone that
inhabits harbours and estuaries and occasionally lagoons where the salinity
is below full strength seawater. Haliplanella lineata attains at least 20
mm high and 13 mm diameter in British specimens but in other parts of the
world could be twice this size. Reproduction by longitudinal fission is
habitual and frequent in this species. 

Haliplanella lineata

TQ 202 043.  

BMLSS Sea Anemones
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/BMLSS/anemone.htm

Cheers

Andy Horton.
[log in to unmask]
><< ( ( ( ' >     
British Marine Life Study Society  (formed 6 June 1990)
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/BMLSS/
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Shorewatch Biological Recording
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/BMLSS/watch2.htm

><< ( ( ( ' >

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