JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives


NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives


NEW-MEDIA-CURATING@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Home

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Home

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING  2002

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING 2002

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Re: February's topic: artist/critic/curator

From:

Josephine Bosma <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Curating digital art - www.newmedia.sunderland.ac.uk/crumb/

Date:

Tue, 5 Feb 2002 17:04:28 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (93 lines)

hello Reiner, Chris and list


to Reiner:

The web is a part of the net, not the other way around. The web came
into being around 1994, the internet in... help me anyone!
1980something. It was then called 'the shiny shopping mall of the net'
because its visuals looked so much more like tv then the text
environments of the early net did. The net is basically an 'empty'
structure of loads of computers linked to eachother which can be used
via all kinds of software (code) to do all sorts of things. Doing email,
chatting, exchanging files (from sound and visuals to text) and all
kinds of search methods... go to a real techie/nerd to show you
everything. It's fascinating. There is an entire world behind the
browser, which is one of the reasons the Browser Day was initiated for
instance.
My definition of net art is different yes, but not that much different.
The only difference with my definition is that I include art works which
relate to the net (or net culture) without actually using its technology
visibly as well. The most common definition is that it is art which is
'net specific', which then usually means it cannot exist beyond the
technological boundaries of the internet. Because of some works by
Alexei Shulgin and Heath Bunting (and I am sure there are others too,
but these I know profoundly) which reached beyond this I have come to my
definition though. It would also be very limiting for the hybrid art of
today to bring in another artificial boundary (some like to call net art
a new 'discipline', which I find horrible! a new development does not
mean a new discipline.) based on tech/material alone. That does not do
justice to this art.

To Chris:

"Is mail art net art?" There have been a few pre histories of net art in
which mail art is one forerunner of net art. In my point of view these
pre histories were written most of all to show that what is generally
considered art history seems to place too much emphasis on art objects
(paintings, sculptures) instead of other influential art practices in
the 20th century.

"Are knitting or embroidery code art?" There have been cases of
'cyberknitting', though these have mostly been people performing all
kinds of ritualistic (?) fiddling with wires in those cheerful days of
netdotart. Maybe knitting is a forerunner of code art  ;)  ?

"Isn't all art about codes and/or networks?" Yes, but the new media
environment (with what Graham Harwood calls 'more people producing
meaningful content') and its global political and economical structures
(computer networks have not just changed the interactions between us
simple folk, but also between governments, banks, armies, mafia etc.)
are the new cultural arena. We can't keep turning a blind eye there.

"So within this context, I would say (feel free to contradict!) that we
have moved from artist-led activity, and artists as curators in the
developmental stage to a relatively professionalised infrastructure
emerging now, where museums and institutions feel more confident about
getting to grips with the technologies and artistic concerns in the
field (....) the art world is now equivalent to artist led initiatives
in other media."

That last point is very important. It is what I was refering to when I
mentioned I wanted to talk about responsibility. Joining the media
environment (which everyone does when posting on a public list or
creating a website) means you enter an existing discourse, an existing
culture. In an environment which is still developing, legally,
technically, socially, this can have a lot of consequences. Think of the
.museum story as highlighted by Jon Ippolito.

"The art world is a ghetto in the larger field of popular culture. Net
art has some things in common with the art world and with certain
sub-cultures within broader popular culture. Like other
technologically-determined forms I guess: sound art and video art spring
to mind. Is this a problem? Not necessarily."

Depends how you look at it. Video art and sound art do not have as many
different forms of appearance as net art does. I sometimes call net art
the merging of media art and more traditional art. Finally the two merge
almost by default, through a media space which is used by 'everyone'.
Yet the connection which also happens there with other cultures (design,
activism, popular culture, folklore even) makes that in the end we see
something that is more then just media art and more traditional art
combined. Should we not adress such a big cultural phenomenon (as it
also affects art) as art critics? We miss an opportunity to analyse the
situation well and act to it if we keep the two seperate.



highest regards again,


J
*

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager