JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for SPACESYNTAX Archives


SPACESYNTAX Archives

SPACESYNTAX Archives


SPACESYNTAX@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

SPACESYNTAX Home

SPACESYNTAX Home

SPACESYNTAX  2001

SPACESYNTAX 2001

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Re: scaling observed pedestrian flows to an area total

From:

Alan Penn <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Alan Penn <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 7 Dec 2001 13:00:20 -0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (62 lines)

Andrew,

this is an interesting idea and a nice thread -  Stephen's results on area
averages coincide exactly with ours for central London areas - the main
difference being that the London areas we looked at are predominantly mixed
residential, retail and office areas.

I think Juan puts the case well for the need to take account of density and
land use, and again our results on London show that these are key factors in
pedestrrian movement area averages. I can see that attractions of a
configurational model that incorporates density (we have tried in the past
weighting axial lines according to the height of buildings by adding lines),
however my approach in this case would probably be slightly simpler than
Juan's.

I would suggest that all that is needed is a regression model in which the
effects of land use and density are incorporated as potential determining
variables. I would be confident (on the basis of the previous studies that
we have done of London areas using this method) that this regression model
would be good enough for one to make estimates with some confidence of the
pedestrian flows in areas that had not been observed, and so arrive at a
reasonable figure for total pedestrian km walked in Central London. The
things I would think likely to be problematic would be in getting access to
good land use and development density data at the axial line scale
(valuation office data might be good enough) and then in getting updates to
these data with the frequency needed if one were to try and track changes.

Ultimately, what you really need if I understand it right, is not just an
estimate of the pedestrian walking volume, but an error estimate as well.
This actually requires a thorough piece of research as error estimates for
the pedestrian mode have never to my knowledge been developed, and certainly
not at the level of the whole central area of a city as big as London. This
could form the basis for a nice responsive mode research application to the
EPSRC if anyone (Juan, Andrew?) were interested in collaborating... :-)

Alan


> -----Original Message-----
> From: [log in to unmask] [mailto:[log in to unmask]]On
> Behalf Of Andrew Smith
> Sent: 04 December 2001 10:37
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: scaling observed pedestrian flows to an area total
>
>
> Dear colleagues,
>
> I'm considering using a space syntax model to estimate the distribution of
> pedestrian flows across London.  The intention is that if the distribution
> is representative, then by calibrating the flows based on observations on
> some sampled links, I can then scale up to calculate the total amount of
> walking on the network.  Then, by continuously monitoring some
> links, I can
> estimate total annual person-km walked in London.
>
> Are any of you acquainted with a previous application of this kind?  Any
> pointers to potential hazards and ways to improve the robustness of the
> methodology will be very welcome.
>
> Andrew Smith
>

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999
1998


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager