JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives


NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives


NEW-MEDIA-CURATING@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Home

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Home

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING  2001

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING 2001

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Re: Installing It. June Theme of the Month

From:

Hannah Redler <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Curating digital art - www.newmedia.sunderland.ac.uk/crumb/

Date:

Thu, 7 Jun 2001 09:38:24 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (112 lines)

Hello list

I'd say probably the most helpful technical tip I can offer is to treat each
project/installation on a case-by-case basis. Obviously it is useful and
desirable for a curator commissioning technological works to have an
understanding of the fundamental characteristics of whatever media the
artists they are working with are using - this is particularly important if
the artists are experimenting with technologies they are not themselves
familiar with, or if there needs to be a very complex installation. If the
curator is unsure or working with inexperienced artists, as Clive says, get
someone from somewhere like MITES on board from the outset.

If I have to be general, the key points I would encourage people to bear in
mind are:

* The technology is always changing - this affects budget and conceptual
issues - a show planned a long time in advance of its delivery dates may
need constant revisions of technical solutions, but it is important to be
clear where the 'art' lies and not compromise this - for example, is it in
the use of a particular lens/video playback system/computer, or is that
unimportant to the resultant content?

* Artists uses of technology are very likely to extend or subvert intended
functions - so no institution/organisation can presume even if it has stock
equipment this will be sufficient for every work.

* Putting on an exhibition of new media works is a team effort (I couldn't
agree more with Clive).

* A clear brief needs to provide the artist with the context their work will
be seen in, as well as details of the physical space and the duration the
work will need to run for.(some more radical or unstable projects can be
more viable in temporary circumstances where they can be manned by humans.
Where a piece has to last for a long time on its own, robustness is more of
an issue.)

* Artist's proposals which provide drawings of proposed technical setup and
list of proposed equipment are really helpful.  This is particularly the
case with artists who are experienced in working with technology, artists
new to it will need more support from the organisation/institution.

* For more complex projects, the artist, curator and technical team, whether
in-house or hired should discuss the brief and the artists' proposal and
installation issues in detail before committing to contract.

* Preparation during the development path of the work is as important as
final installation. With digital projects bug-test, bug-test, bug-test. Then
don't get upset if they still develop glitches once they're running, they
will.

* Which brings me to my final point, never presume that once it's installed
and turned on that's it.  New media works in galleries need daily checking
and plenty of TLC. Even when the software/content is completely flawless,
you can pretty much depend on a projector that's up for a long time to slip
inconveniently, or a child to access the system software on a the kiosk (ok,
this is avoidable, but you need to take measures!)

So I don't know how much help I've been about the nitty-gritty of
installation. For the Science Museum's Wellcome Wing,  which I commissioned
4 large-scale multiuser interactive installations for from Christian Moeller
('Particles', 'Insound Out'), David Rokeby (' Watch and Measured') and Tessa
Elliott and Jonathan Jones Morris ('Machination'), the successful delivery
depended on the artists, all of whom are exceptional technicians in their
own right and provided many of the final solutions, the museum's technical
group under Dave Patten, the exhibition designers (Casson Mann), and through
them the fit-out contractors, and also Mark Haig, a MITES technician for
actaul installation. I played chief coordinator/nag in the middle. And,yes,
it did involve a lot of nagging ;-) although I guess brokering is the more
politic way to describe it!

I'm quite happy to describe the installations in detail but am not sure that
it would be much help. The situation was an unusual, because it was
permanent works commissioned for a brand new building in a national Museum.
Production values and health and safety issues were therefore about as
demanding as it gets. The works needed to be able to support the use of up
to 1.8 million visitors per annum in terms of artistic concept
(reception/interpretation/accessibility etc) and robustness.

A further 'complication' was that the money for the commissions became
available after the exhibition design structure had already been fixed.
This meant that the artists had to configure their ideas to work within a
very prescriptive structure. They were aware of this from the start, as the
invitation to propose included drawings of the building plans and the
exhibition design as well as details of the surrounding content within the
context of which their works would be received.  Indeed, some artist I
approached to propose did not think they could show their works in this
context, and Christian made the very interesting point that once the project
was completed and installed in the structure he knew it could not only be
his work. i.e. it is his work, but within the Casson Mann designed
structure, within the context of the 'uber-brand' of Science Museum. This is
an interesting thought in relation to the amount of corporates that are
taking an interest in media work.

If anyone has questions, or indeed comments if they have seen the work, I'd
be very happy to respond.

Bye for now

Hannah

#####################################################################################
This e-mail message has been scanned for Viruses and Content and cleared
by MailMarshal
For more information please visit www.marshalsoftware.com
#####################################################################################

#####################################################################################
This e-mail message has been scanned for Viruses and Content and cleared
by MailMarshal
For more information please visit www.marshalsoftware.com
#####################################################################################

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager