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FORCED-MIGRATION  July 2017

FORCED-MIGRATION July 2017

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Subject:

New publications: International Detention Coalition, IDMC, and IRRI

From:

Forced Migration List <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Forced Migration List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 13:22:18 +0000

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Never in a child’s best interests: A review of laws that prohibit child immigration detention
International Detention Coalition Briefing Paper No. 2, June 2017
By Robyn Sampson, Ben Lewis and Ada Kapetanovik
Available to download at: http://idcoalition.org/briefing-papers/

This briefing paper reviews the applicable human rights standards regarding child immigration detention, highlighting expert clarifications that the detention of children in the context of migration is never in their best interests and always a child rights violation. The paper then reviews the ways in which this standard is implemented in legal frameworks by describing laws in over 15 countries that establish safeguards against child immigration detention.


IDMC Briefing Paper - Two steps forward, one step back

This week, progress against the targets of the 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development has been reviewed at the High Level Political Forum in New York. The six Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in focus this year are on reducing poverty (SDG 1), hunger (SDG 2), improving health (SDG 3), gender equality (SDG 5), building resilient industry and infrastructure (SDG 9), and protecting the marine environment (SDG 14).
 
All of the goals are relevant to internal displacement as progress can help prevent displacement and reduce its negative impacts. Investments into these six areas, however, can also generate new vulnerabilities and risks, and undermine the overall achievement of the 2030 agenda. One risk is forced displacement of people from their homes and livelihoods.
 
This briefing paper explores the relationship between the six goals under review this year and internal displacement across the globe. SDG 9, and the associated investments in infrastructure and industrial development, is of particular interest: while building resilient infrastructure is critical to broader economic development, it also regularly displaces people from their homes, and can result in new poverty and marginalisation.
 
The trade-offs inherent in development investment must therefore be made visible. Participants at this year’s High Level Forum should consider the connections between the different SDGs, to make sure progress in one area does not set back advances in others. In this briefing paper, we highlight these connections and the need to identify, measure and expose both progress and setbacks within the 2030 Agenda.
 
The briefing paper is available here: http://www.internal-displacement.org/library/publications/2017/two-steps-forward-one-step-back?ref=mailchimp 


IRRI Policy Paper - Aligning refugee policies with refugee realities

IRRI is launching a policy paper that draws on six years of field research in the Great Lakes region, incorporating nine units of field research. Each study focused on the links between citizenship and forced displacement in the Great Lakes region and examined both the differences and the interaction between local and national understandings of belonging.
 
The paper considers both national and local articulations of belonging that came through the studies, and the extent to which these realities resonate – or fail to resonate – with policy approaches. It points to the need for refugee policy to be bottom up, rather than top-down, something that has long been recognised by practitioners and academics alike but has yet to infuse much programming on the ground. It argues that if refugee policy were to be aligned with the coping mechanisms of refugees (rather than the other way around), mobility and inclusion would become the hallmarks of refugee protection. 

For more information read the full paper here http://www.refugee-rights.org/Publications/Papers/2017/Realigning%20refugee%20policy%20FINAL.pdf   or contact us here http://www.refugee-rights.org/Contact%20us/contact.html 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Note: The material contained in this communication comes to you from the Forced Migration Discussion List which is moderated by the Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford. It does not necessarily reflect the views of the RSC or the University. If you re-print, copy, archive or re-post this message please retain this disclaimer. Quotations or extracts should include attribution to the original sources.

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