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Subject:

New publications, including the Kaldor Centre, IDMC, and the child in international refugee law

From:

Forced Migration List <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Forced Migration List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 4 May 2017 13:39:18 +0000

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text/plain (46 lines)

New publications:

Rethinking International Protection: The Sovereign, the State, the Refugee, by Raffaela Puggioni. Palgrave MacMillan, ISBN: 978-1-137-48309-6 (Print) 978-1-137-48310-2 (Online) http://www.springer.com/gb/book/9781137483096   
The book provides a critical account of the concept of international protection, by questioning the meaning or protection and distinguish it from the concept of assistance. It is argued that protection should not simply entail a protection from - from persecution, threats, and sustained violence – but a protection that leads toward emancipation. By focusing on the local and national contexts wherein protection is enacted, created and also contested, the book combines the politics of protection with the practices of protection, with a special focus on Italy.
 
Dams and internal displacement - new IDMC case study series
China - Lessons Learned from the Manwan Dam
China’s population growth, rising living standards and focus on exports increased annual energy consumption by fivefold between 1980 and 2010. Hydropower projects are prioritised in China in order to meet high electricity demands and the country is home to nearly half of the world’s 50,000 large dams.
In 1996, the construction of the Manwan Dam on the Upper Mekong River displaced 7,260 people, twice the official estimate. The displacement and resettlement process was plagued by insufficient government oversight, limited financial and technical resources and a lack of community consultation and social impact assessment to plan for resettlement. The first case study of the series discusses how insufficient government oversight, limited resources, lack of community consultation and a late social impact assessment increased the vulnerability of China’s Manwan Dam’s IDPs. 
The case study is available http://www.internal-displacement.org/assets/publications/2017/20170411-idmc-china-dam-case-study.pdf 

Emergency within an Emergency:  The Growing Epidemic of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse of Migrant Children in Greece
A report by the Harvard FXB Center, available here:  https://fxb.harvard.edu/new-report-emergency-within-an-emergency-exploitation-of-migrant-children-in-greece/ 
 
'Communicating the ‘migrant’ other as risk: space, EU and expanding borders', by 
Abstract
Forced migration and border spaces as fault lines posing risks to society through the notion of ‘Othering’, remain under-explored in risk literature. With Europe facing its biggest humanitarian crisis with forced migration and displacement due to conflict zones, the borders of the European Union have received renewed attention in media. Refugees and the displaced are often depicted as ‘migrants’ and are seen as transgressing borders as illegitimate entities. Although increasing attention has been paid to border patrol and issues of securitization since 9/11, the ‘migrant’ body as ‘risky body’ in political and policy discussions is under-conceptualized and theorized in risk literature. We examine political discourses of the UK Government to discern how the migrant and the expanding borders of the EU are framed as forms of societal and economic risk and equally how these are mitigated with and through the discourse of space and borders. We take a constructionist approach to the ‘migrant’ problem in the EU and UK where risk is socially constructed through political discourse.
Copies at link, http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/WSTVAynErJ6yqFKfmks5/full 
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13669877.2017.1313765 

The Child in International Refugee Law, by Jason M Pobjoy (Blackstone Chambers, London)
Children are the victims of some of the most devastating examples of state-sanctioned and private human rights abuse. In increasing numbers, they are attempting to find international protection, and are forced to navigate complex administrative and legal processes that fail to take into account their distinct needs and vulnerabilities. The key challenges they face in establishing entitlement to refugee protection are their invisibility and the risk of incorrect assessment. Drawing on an extensive and original analysis of jurisprudence of leading common law jurisdictions, this book undertakes an assessment of the extent to which these challenges may be overcome by greater engagement between international refugee law and international law on the rights of the child. The result is the first comprehensive study on the manner in which these two mutually reinforcing legal regimes can interact to strengthen the protection of refugee children.
To order visit www.cambridge.org/9781316627402 

New Kaldor Centre Policy Brief
'The interdiction of asylum seekers at sea: law and (mal)practice in Europe and Australia'
There is a growing chasm between international law and the ways in which Australia and the European Union respond to people who seek protection by boat. 
   A new policy brief from the Andrew & Renata Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law, released today, outlines why a comprehensive, humanitarian ‘protection-centred vision’ must replace the present military-led, border control approach that dominates EU and Australian policies towards asylum seekers at sea.
    In The interdiction of asylum seekers at sea: Law and (mal)practice in Europe and Australia, Dr Violeta Moreno-Lax evaluates these policies against States’ obligations under international law. She concludes that turning back boats neither complies with relevant legal standards, nor is viable as a long-term strategy. 
Read the brief at: http://www.kaldorcentre.unsw.edu.au/news/do-boat-turnbacks-stack-new-kaldor-centre-policy-brief-evaluates-eu-and-australian-policies 
Related Opinion Piece – Does it matter how we “stop the boats”’?: http://www.kaldorcentre.unsw.edu.au/publication/does-it-matter-how-we-%E2%80%9Cstop-boats%E2%80%9D 
Plus:
The related Op-Ed summarizes the key points: http://www.theage.com.au/comment/stopping-the-boats-is-a-futile-cynical-exercise-20170502-gvxc7q.html
The brief has been reported by The Guardian (which also captures the key messages): https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/may/03/asylum-seeker-boat-turnbacks-illegal-and-dont-deter-people-report-finds

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Note: The material contained in this communication comes to you from the Forced Migration Discussion List which is moderated by the Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford. It does not necessarily reflect the views of the RSC or the University. If you re-print, copy, archive or re-post this message please retain this disclaimer. Quotations or extracts should include attribution to the original sources.

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