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Subject:

Re: accessibility books etc

From:

Dieuwertje Dyi Huijg <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Dieuwertje Dyi Huijg <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 7 Dec 2017 19:15:27 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (3872 lines)

people in the UK/EU can request an accessible copy of (their) book. when my vision was worse, i actually have done it for a book from Cambridge Press and they sent me a CD or DVD or so. so presumably they can send it differently as well.

http://www.copyrightuser.org/understand/exceptions/disability/
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/exceptions-to-copyright

possibly they will send it to Australia - not that it resolves the accessibility issue at large.

re the bookshare project: there is a bookshare in the UK https://www.bookshare.org/cms/country/UK as well as in Australia: https://www.bookshare.org/cms/bookshare-australia
though, if i recall correctly, i couldn't have access at the time because i was not registered as visually/vision impaired.

re the issue of cost of a book: not all publishers charge the same price, so this can be influenced to some extent - also re the publication of paperbacks and ebooks. i know this because others have done it, but admittedly i've never published myself - so there's that.



Best wishes,

Dyi


D. Dyi Huijg
PhD Candidate in Sociology, University of Manchester
[log in to unmask]
http://manchester.academia.edu/DieuwertjeDyiHuijg

________________________________________
From: The Disability-Research Discussion List [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of DISABILITY-RESEARCH automatic digest system [[log in to unmask]]
Sent: 07 December 2017 18:51
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: DISABILITY-RESEARCH Digest - 6 Dec 2017 to 7 Dec 2017 - Special issue (#2017-233)

There are 11 messages totaling 10413 lines in this issue.

Topics in this special issue:

  1. Deadline approaching for Call for Papers: Disability and Shame
  2. Latest Issue of RDS Forum on Cripping Care is Out!
  3. New book, Blindness and Writing (5)
  4. BOOK ACCESS   RE: [DISABILITY-RESEARCH] New book, Blindness and Writing
     (2)
  5. SJDR open access
  6. GREAT NEWS!!   OR IS IT??? SJDR open access

________________End of message________________

This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).

Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]

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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 6 Dec 2017 14:55:11 -1000
From:    Megan Conway <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Deadline approaching for Call for Papers: Disability and Shame

Call for Papers Deadline on Disability and Shame Approaching!

The Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal (RDS) seeks
proposals for a special forum "Disability and Shame." The deadline for
submission of papers is January 1, 2018.

Papers should be submitted online at http://rdsjournal.org.
We look forward to receiving your submissions.

If you have any questions regarding the forum, please contact
[log in to unmask], [log in to unmask], or
[log in to unmask] For other technical questions
contact [log in to unmask]

For more information visit **
http://rdsjournal.org/index.php/journal/announcement
(http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/ojs/index.php/journal/announcement)

CALL FOR PAPERS. Special Issue | Volume 14 Issue 4 Disability and
Shame. Shame and shaming take varied and quite diversely motivated
forms. Shame exists as both a cultural and psychological construct,
stimuli for and reactions to which are heavily context-dependent. This
Call for Papers proposes a forum on the subject of shame and
disability, broadly conceived. It is hoped that through critical
discourse addressing the historical and current contexts, contributing
factors, effects, and responses to shame, greater understanding of
this phenomena will diminish discrimination and violence. DUE JANUARY
1, 2018. Guest Editors: Dr.John Y. Jones [log in to unmask] Dr.Dana Lee
Baker [log in to unmask] Dr.Stephanie
[log in to unmask]


*Megan A. Conway, Ph.D.*

*Director of Instruction and Training, Center on Disability Studies
<http://www.cds.hawaii.edu>*,


*University of Hawaii at Manoa <http://www.manoa.hawaii.edu>Editor, Review
of Disability Studies: An International Journal
<http://www.rds.hawaii.edu>Coordinator, Disability and Diversity Studies
Certificate Program <http://cds.hawaii.edu/certificates>*
*Phone*: 808-956-6166 *Fax*: 808-956-7878 *Email*: [log in to unmask]
*Office Location*: Room 131
*Mailing Address*: Center on Disability Studies, University of Hawaii at
Manoa, 1410 Lower Campus Road 171F, Honolulu, HI 96822-2313

________________End of message________________

This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).

Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]

Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html

You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 6 Dec 2017 14:55:23 -1000
From:    Megan Conway <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Latest Issue of RDS Forum on Cripping Care is Out!

Aloha, pleased to announce the release of Volume 13 issue 4 of the Review
of Disability Studies. This issue features a forum on "Cripping Care" that
you won't want to miss. You can view my editorial "Is this a Marriage or a
Carriage" on our RDS blog
https://rdsinternationaljournal.blogspot.com/

From Canada to India, Guatemala to Germany, this issue includes a
special research forum on "Cripping Care: Care Pedagogies and
Practices," as well as multimedia, creative works, and a selection of
the latest in disability studies’ dissertations & abstracts.


Visit our website to read the full issue at http://bit.ly/RDSJ_v13i4
(http://bit.ly/RDS_v13i4)

Become a subscriber today - subscriptions start at just $25.00
Subscribe Now (http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/ojs/index.php/journal/about/subscriptions)
Connect with us on Facebook and
Twitter!https://www.facebook.com/Review-of-Disability-Studies-125422137523733/https://twitter.com/revofdisstudhttp://www.rds.hawaii.edu/
mailto:[log in to unmask]

Volume 13 Issue 4 | Table of Contents


** Editorial
------------------------------------------------------------
Is this a Marriage or a Carriage? (http://bit.ly/RDS_816)
Megan A. Conway, Ph.D., RDS Editor-In-Chief
Hawaii, USA
Visit http://bit.ly/RDS_816

------------------------------------------------------------


** Cripping Care: Care Pedagogies and Practices Special Forum
------------------------------------------------------------
Cripping Care: Care Pedagogies and Practices (http://bit.ly/RDSJ_641)
Guest Editors: Patty Douglas, Ph.D, Brandon University, Carla Rice,
University of Guelph, and Christine Kelly, Ph.D., University of
Manitoba
Canada
Visit http://bit.ly/RDS_779

Too Much to Too Little? Paradoxes of Disability and Care Work in India
(http://bit.ly/RDSJ_736)
Nandini Ghosh, Ph.D., & Supurna Banerjee, Ph.D., Institute of
Development Studies Kolkata
India
Visit http://bit.ly/RDS_749

Cripping Care for Individuals with Psychiatric Disability: Looking
Beyond Self-Determination Framework to Address Treatment and Recovery
(http://bit.ly/RDSJ_736)
Meghann Elizabeth O'Leary, University of Illinois Chicago
Illinois, USA
Visit http://bit.ly/RDS_751

What is a Service Animal? A Careful Rethinking (http://bit.ly/RDSJ_736)
Margaret Price, Ohio State University
Ohio, USA
Visit http://bit.ly/RDS_757

Teaching and Care: Cripping Fieldwork in Teacher Education
(http://bit.ly/RDSJ_736)
Susan Baglieri, Ph.D., & Jessica Bacon, Ph.D., Montclair State University
New Jersey, USA
Visit http://bit.ly/RDS_753

------------------------------------------------------------


** Multimedia
------------------------------------------------------------

A Question & Answer with Helen S. Cohen, Filmmaker of States of Grace
(http://bit.ly/RDSJ_752)
Raphael Raphael, Ph.D., RDS Associate Editor of Creative Works and Multimedia
Guatemala
Visit http://bit.ly/RDS_806

------------------------------------------------------------


** Creative Works
------------------------------------------------------------

Cancer Kung Fu: Fighting Back Through Writing and Drawing
(http://bit.ly/RDSJ_742)
Anna Faroqhi, Transart Institute
Germany
Visit http://bit.ly/RDS_804

------------------------------------------------------------


** Dissertations and Abstracts
------------------------------------------------------------

Disability Studies Dissertations Abstracts (http://bit.ly/RDSJ_791)
Jonathan Erlen, Megan Conway
Visit http://bit.ly/RDS_809
Subscribe Now (http://www.rds.hawaii.edu/ojs/index.php/journal/about/subscriptions)



*Megan A. Conway, Ph.D.*

*Director of Instruction and Training, Center on Disability Studies
<http://www.cds.hawaii.edu>*,


*University of Hawaii at Manoa <http://www.manoa.hawaii.edu>Editor, Review
of Disability Studies: An International Journal
<http://www.rds.hawaii.edu>Coordinator, Disability and Diversity Studies
Certificate Program <http://cds.hawaii.edu/certificates>*
*Phone*: 808-956-6166 *Fax*: 808-956-7878 *Email*: [log in to unmask]
*Office Location*: Room 131
*Mailing Address*: Center on Disability Studies, University of Hawaii at
Manoa, 1410 Lower Campus Road 171F, Honolulu, HI 96822-2313

________________End of message________________

This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).

Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]

Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html

You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.

------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 7 Dec 2017 02:37:35 +0000
From:    Janice Ollerton <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing

I'm bemused by the term 'visually impaired'. My vision impaired friends often joke that they "don't look so bad as to be described as a visual impairment". Maybe this author needs to amend her terminology.

Janice

Sent from my phone

________________________________
From: The Disability-Research Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of Beth Omansky <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, December 7, 2017 9:47:14 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing

I agree with Kim.  We ought to be putting pressure on publishers.  Even when a publisher offers Ebooks, it's not a guarantee the 3rd party platform will be accessible.  As authors, we ought to make sure our publishers will offer Ebook or accessible PDFs before we sign our contracts.

BTW, Bookshare is not free to everyone in the U.S.  If you're not a student somewhere, it costs $50 per year.

Beth

*******************
“The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”   Mark Twain
 *****************
Beth Omansky, Ph.D.
Portland, OR
USA
[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>



-----Original Message-----
From: Kim Steele <[log in to unmask]>
To: DISABILITY-RESEARCH <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 2:11 pm
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing

Unfortunately, authors have little say over the price a particular publisher sets for their books. If they did, most would make them very reasonable so more people could access them.

According to the author, it appears that Cambridge University Press will be making some attempt at increasing accessibility for VIP via Adobe eBook. It seems that rather than castigating the author, it may make more sense to target publishers.

Kim Steele

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
From: Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>>
Date: Wed, December 06, 2017 1:44 pm
To: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>

I’m not being defensive. I’m neither the author nor the publisher. I just wanted to point out that at least in the USA, books through book share are free for what they call  print impaired users. I know it doesn’t help non-USA people.

You might want to encourage your own national governments to either fund or set up their own system like Bookshare where books in accessible formats are free to blind/VI/print impaired users. It’s not perfect but you also can’t complain about free books.

I’m actually worried as the USA federal government may defund Bookshare along with other BVI services.


Karen Nakamura (she/her/hers)
Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and Professor of Anthropology
Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology
University of California Berkeley
[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
disability.jp/nakamura<http://disability.jp/nakamura>
________________________________
From: Pamela <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>>
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:27:01 PM
To: Karen Nakamura
Cc: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing

Your defensive statements do not hold water. The book should be accessible. Accessibility does not mean disable people must make extrea effort

the non-disabled people do not have to make. Your service is discriminatory, no matter who accepts your behaviour, or where it is enacted.

Dr Pamela Waugh
> On 7 Dec 2017, at 8:20 am, Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>
> At least in the USA, this title and many others are available through BookShare, which an initiative of the US Department of Education and operated by Benetech. It makes many books including academic titles, available for print-impaired persons (which includes not just blind and visually impaired, but folks who are dyslexic, those who can’t read because of other processing disabilities, physical disabilities, migraines, etc.).
>
> https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287
>
> I know this is a UK mailing list and that you’re in Australia, so it doesn’t help; but if there are list members in the USA, I thought you’d want to know.
>
> Still doesn’t excuse the high price of the book.
>
> Karen
>
>
>> On Dec 6, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Pamela <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> This book is of particular interest to me, as a visionimpaired author, but Iwill not be reading or buying it.
>>
>> I will not read it because it is advertised only in hard copy, and i will not scan it. It should be available
>>
>> in an electronic format. Secondly, I will not buy it because it is advertised at the price of AUD 155.
>>
>> The presentation of your book makes me wonder if you have any experience either as an author or as a vision-impaired persom (VIP).
>>
>> You must/should know the a minute percentage of VIPs are blind or sightless. Sightlessness is most people's
>>
>> assumption of blindness, so behave as if their assumption is correct. If you have researched disabled people's history, you must know that
>>
>> their stance is 'Nothing about us without us.'
>>
>> I hope the marketing of your book markedly improves.
>>
>> Dr Pamela Waugh
>>
>> Canberra Australia
>>
>>
>>> On 7 Dec 2017, at 2:12 am, Heather Tilley <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Dear Colleagues,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I'm pleased to send notice of my book ‘Blindness and Writing: From Wordsworth to Gissing' which has just been published in hardback by Cambridge University Press (ISBN 9781107194212).
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> In the book I examine the huge shifts that took place in the experience and conceptualisation of blindness during the nineteenth century. Considering the ways in which visually-impaired people used texts to shape their own identities, I argue that blindness was also a means by which writers reflected on crafting literary form. The book:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> o     - Offers revisionary readings of nineteenth-century canonical authors
>>>
>>> o     - Extends understandings of disabled and embodied identity
>>>
>>> o     - Presents a range of under-researched archival material relating to the history of disability
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> For more information please visit www.cambridge.org/9781107194212<http://www.cambridge.org/9781107194212>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> The book will also be made available in accessible format to all the institutions who participate in the RNIB's Bookshare programme. Cambridge University Press are also working on having a special version of the Adobe eBook produced with a ‘read out loud’ feature which will be made available for sale on their website when ready.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Many thanks
>>>
>>> Heather
>>>
>>> (Please note I am on maternity leave until the end of May 2018 so it may take me a little while to respond to any queries).
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Dr Heather Tilley
>>> Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow
>>> Department of English and Humanities
>>> Birkbeck, University of London
>>> 43 Gordon Square
>>> London WC1H 0PD
>>>
>>> Email: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>> Staff profile: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley
>>> Projects: http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/
>>>                https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ________________End of message________________
>>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies<http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies>).
>>>
>>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>>
>>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html<http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html>
>>>
>>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>>
>>
>> ________________End of message________________
>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies<http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies>).
>>
>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>
>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html<http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html>
>>
>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>
>

________________End of message________________
This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies<http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies>).
Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html<http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html>
You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
________________End of message________________
This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies<http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies>).
Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html<http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html>
You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.

*******************
“The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”   Mark Twain
 *****************
Beth Omansky, Ph.D.
Portland, OR
USA
[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>



-----Original Message-----
From: Kim Steele <[log in to unmask]>
To: DISABILITY-RESEARCH <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 2:11 pm
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing

Unfortunately, authors have little say over the price a particular publisher sets for their books. If they did, most would make them very reasonable so more people could access them.

According to the author, it appears that Cambridge University Press will be making some attempt at increasing accessibility for VIP via Adobe eBook. It seems that rather than castigating the author, it may make more sense to target publishers.

Kim Steele

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
From: Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>>
Date: Wed, December 06, 2017 1:44 pm
To: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>

I’m not being defensive. I’m neither the author nor the publisher. I just wanted to point out that at least in the USA, books through book share are free for what they call  print impaired users. I know it doesn’t help non-USA people.

You might want to encourage your own national governments to either fund or set up their own system like Bookshare where books in accessible formats are free to blind/VI/print impaired users. It’s not perfect but you also can’t complain about free books.

I’m actually worried as the USA federal government may defund Bookshare along with other BVI services.


Karen Nakamura (she/her/hers)
Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and Professor of Anthropology
Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology
University of California Berkeley
[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
disability.jp/nakamura<http://disability.jp/nakamura>
________________________________
From: Pamela <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>>
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:27:01 PM
To: Karen Nakamura
Cc: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing

Your defensive statements do not hold water. The book should be accessible. Accessibility does not mean disable people must make extrea effort

the non-disabled people do not have to make. Your service is discriminatory, no matter who accepts your behaviour, or where it is enacted.

Dr Pamela Waugh
> On 7 Dec 2017, at 8:20 am, Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>
> At least in the USA, this title and many others are available through BookShare, which an initiative of the US Department of Education and operated by Benetech. It makes many books including academic titles, available for print-impaired persons (which includes not just blind and visually impaired, but folks who are dyslexic, those who can’t read because of other processing disabilities, physical disabilities, migraines, etc.).
>
> https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287
>
> I know this is a UK mailing list and that you’re in Australia, so it doesn’t help; but if there are list members in the USA, I thought you’d want to know.
>
> Still doesn’t excuse the high price of the book.
>
> Karen
>
>
>> On Dec 6, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Pamela <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> This book is of particular interest to me, as a visionimpaired author, but Iwill not be reading or buying it.
>>
>> I will not read it because it is advertised only in hard copy, and i will not scan it. It should be available
>>
>> in an electronic format. Secondly, I will not buy it because it is advertised at the price of AUD 155.
>>
>> The presentation of your book makes me wonder if you have any experience either as an author or as a vision-impaired persom (VIP).
>>
>> You must/should know the a minute percentage of VIPs are blind or sightless. Sightlessness is most people's
>>
>> assumption of blindness, so behave as if their assumption is correct. If you have researched disabled people's history, you must know that
>>
>> their stance is 'Nothing about us without us.'
>>
>> I hope the marketing of your book markedly improves.
>>
>> Dr Pamela Waugh
>>
>> Canberra Australia
>>
>>
>>> On 7 Dec 2017, at 2:12 am, Heather Tilley <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Dear Colleagues,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I'm pleased to send notice of my book ‘Blindness and Writing: From Wordsworth to Gissing' which has just been published in hardback by Cambridge University Press (ISBN 9781107194212).
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> In the book I examine the huge shifts that took place in the experience and conceptualisation of blindness during the nineteenth century. Considering the ways in which visually-impaired people used texts to shape their own identities, I argue that blindness was also a means by which writers reflected on crafting literary form. The book:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> o     - Offers revisionary readings of nineteenth-century canonical authors
>>>
>>> o     - Extends understandings of disabled and embodied identity
>>>
>>> o     - Presents a range of under-researched archival material relating to the history of disability
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> For more information please visit www.cambridge.org/9781107194212<http://www.cambridge.org/9781107194212>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> The book will also be made available in accessible format to all the institutions who participate in the RNIB's Bookshare programme. Cambridge University Press are also working on having a special version of the Adobe eBook produced with a ‘read out loud’ feature which will be made available for sale on their website when ready.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Many thanks
>>>
>>> Heather
>>>
>>> (Please note I am on maternity leave until the end of May 2018 so it may take me a little while to respond to any queries).
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Dr Heather Tilley
>>> Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow
>>> Department of English and Humanities
>>> Birkbeck, University of London
>>> 43 Gordon Square
>>> London WC1H 0PD
>>>
>>> Email: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>> Staff profile: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley
>>> Projects: http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/
>>>                https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ________________End of message________________
>>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies<http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies>).
>>>
>>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>>
>>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html<http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html>
>>>
>>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>>
>>
>> ________________End of message________________
>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies<http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies>).
>>
>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>
>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html<http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html>
>>
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>>
>

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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 6 Dec 2017 19:03:17 -0800
From:    Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing

Hiya -

At least in the United States, the terminology “blind and visually impaired” is widely used. I’m not blind myself and so I try to use the terminology that communities use. I take my direction from Lighthouse and NFB — but I’m also aware that many people feel that these organizations don’t represent all blind people. In any case, when referring to any single individual, I use the term that that person prefers. What do you prefer we use for you?

We should remember that not everyone will agree on language.  I belong to the  mad scholars / psychiatric disability communities and there is absolutely no consensus there on what terminology to use. If you use any term, you’re sure to offend someone.


Warmly,

Karen



> On Dec 6, 2017, at 6:37 PM, Janice Ollerton <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> I'm bemused by the term 'visually impaired'. My vision impaired friends often joke that they "don't look so bad as to be described as a visual impairment". Maybe this author needs to amend her terminology.
>
> Janice
>
> Sent from my phone
>
> From: The Disability-Research Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of Beth Omansky <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Thursday, December 7, 2017 9:47:14 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>
> I agree with Kim.  We ought to be putting pressure on publishers.  Even when a publisher offers Ebooks, it's not a guarantee the 3rd party platform will be accessible.  As authors, we ought to make sure our publishers will offer Ebook or accessible PDFs before we sign our contracts.
>
> BTW, Bookshare is not free to everyone in the U.S.  If you're not a student somewhere, it costs $50 per year.
>
> Beth
>
> *******************
> “The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”   Mark Twain
>  *****************
> Beth Omansky, Ph.D.
> Portland, OR
> USA
> [log in to unmask]
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Kim Steele <[log in to unmask]>
> To: DISABILITY-RESEARCH <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 2:11 pm
> Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>
> Unfortunately, authors have little say over the price a particular publisher sets for their books. If they did, most would make them very reasonable so more people could access them.
>
> According to the author, it appears that Cambridge University Press will be making some attempt at increasing accessibility for VIP via Adobe eBook. It seems that rather than castigating the author, it may make more sense to target publishers.
>
> Kim Steele
>
> -------- Original Message --------
> Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
> From: Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]>
> Date: Wed, December 06, 2017 1:44 pm
> To: [log in to unmask]
>
> I’m not being defensive. I’m neither the author nor the publisher. I just wanted to point out that at least in the USA, books through book share are free for what they call  print impaired users. I know it doesn’t help non-USA people.
>
> You might want to encourage your own national governments to either fund or set up their own system like Bookshare where books in accessible formats are free to blind/VI/print impaired users. It’s not perfect but you also can’t complain about free books.
>
> I’m actually worried as the USA federal government may defund Bookshare along with other BVI services.
>
>
> Karen Nakamura (she/her/hers)
> Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and Professor of Anthropology
> Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology
> University of California Berkeley
> [log in to unmask]
> disability.jp/nakamura
> From: Pamela <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:27:01 PM
> To: Karen Nakamura
> Cc: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>
> Your defensive statements do not hold water. The book should be accessible. Accessibility does not mean disable people must make extrea effort
>
> the non-disabled people do not have to make. Your service is discriminatory, no matter who accepts your behaviour, or where it is enacted.
>
> Dr Pamela Waugh
> > On 7 Dec 2017, at 8:20 am, Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >
> > At least in the USA, this title and many others are available through BookShare, which an initiative of the US Department of Education and operated by Benetech. It makes many books including academic titles, available for print-impaired persons (which includes not just blind and visually impaired, but folks who are dyslexic, those who can’t read because of other processing disabilities, physical disabilities, migraines, etc.).
> >
> > https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287
> >
> > I know this is a UK mailing list and that you’re in Australia, so it doesn’t help; but if there are list members in the USA, I thought you’d want to know.
> >
> > Still doesn’t excuse the high price of the book.
> >
> > Karen
> >
> >
> >> On Dec 6, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Pamela <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >>
> >> Hi,
> >>
> >> This book is of particular interest to me, as a visionimpaired author, but Iwill not be reading or buying it.
> >>
> >> I will not read it because it is advertised only in hard copy, and i will not scan it. It should be available
> >>
> >> in an electronic format. Secondly, I will not buy it because it is advertised at the price of AUD 155.
> >>
> >> The presentation of your book makes me wonder if you have any experience either as an author or as a vision-impaired persom (VIP).
> >>
> >> You must/should know the a minute percentage of VIPs are blind or sightless. Sightlessness is most people's
> >>
> >> assumption of blindness, so behave as if their assumption is correct. If you have researched disabled people's history, you must know that
> >>
> >> their stance is 'Nothing about us without us.'
> >>
> >> I hope the marketing of your book markedly improves.
> >>
> >> Dr Pamela Waugh
> >>
> >> Canberra Australia
> >>
> >>
> >>> On 7 Dec 2017, at 2:12 am, Heather Tilley <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Dear Colleagues,
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> I'm pleased to send notice of my book ‘Blindness and Writing: From Wordsworth to Gissing' which has just been published in hardback by Cambridge University Press (ISBN 9781107194212).
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> In the book I examine the huge shifts that took place in the experience and conceptualisation of blindness during the nineteenth century. Considering the ways in which visually-impaired people used texts to shape their own identities, I argue that blindness was also a means by which writers reflected on crafting literary form. The book:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> o     - Offers revisionary readings of nineteenth-century canonical authors
> >>>
> >>> o     - Extends understandings of disabled and embodied identity
> >>>
> >>> o     - Presents a range of under-researched archival material relating to the history of disability
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> For more information please visit www.cambridge.org/9781107194212
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> The book will also be made available in accessible format to all the institutions who participate in the RNIB's Bookshare programme. Cambridge University Press are also working on having a special version of the Adobe eBook produced with a ‘read out loud’ feature which will be made available for sale on their website when ready.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Many thanks
> >>>
> >>> Heather
> >>>
> >>> (Please note I am on maternity leave until the end of May 2018 so it may take me a little while to respond to any queries).
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> --
> >>> Dr Heather Tilley
> >>> Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow
> >>> Department of English and Humanities
> >>> Birkbeck, University of London
> >>> 43 Gordon Square
> >>> London WC1H 0PD
> >>>
> >>> Email: [log in to unmask]
> >>> Staff profile: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley
> >>> Projects: http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/
> >>>                https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> ________________End of message________________
> >>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
> >>>
> >>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
> >>>
> >>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
> >>>
> >>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
> >>>
> >>
> >> ________________End of message________________
> >> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
> >>
> >> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
> >>
> >> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
> >>
> >> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
> >>
> >
>
> ________________End of message________________
> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
> ________________End of message________________
> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>
> *******************
> “The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”   Mark Twain
>  *****************
> Beth Omansky, Ph.D.
> Portland, OR
> USA
> [log in to unmask]
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Kim Steele <[log in to unmask]>
> To: DISABILITY-RESEARCH <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 2:11 pm
> Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>
> Unfortunately, authors have little say over the price a particular publisher sets for their books. If they did, most would make them very reasonable so more people could access them.
>
> According to the author, it appears that Cambridge University Press will be making some attempt at increasing accessibility for VIP via Adobe eBook. It seems that rather than castigating the author, it may make more sense to target publishers.
>
> Kim Steele
>
> -------- Original Message --------
> Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
> From: Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]>
> Date: Wed, December 06, 2017 1:44 pm
> To: [log in to unmask]
>
> I’m not being defensive. I’m neither the author nor the publisher. I just wanted to point out that at least in the USA, books through book share are free for what they call  print impaired users. I know it doesn’t help non-USA people.
>
> You might want to encourage your own national governments to either fund or set up their own system like Bookshare where books in accessible formats are free to blind/VI/print impaired users. It’s not perfect but you also can’t complain about free books.
>
> I’m actually worried as the USA federal government may defund Bookshare along with other BVI services.
>
>
> Karen Nakamura (she/her/hers)
> Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and Professor of Anthropology
> Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology
> University of California Berkeley
> [log in to unmask]
> disability.jp/nakamura
> From: Pamela <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:27:01 PM
> To: Karen Nakamura
> Cc: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>
> Your defensive statements do not hold water. The book should be accessible. Accessibility does not mean disable people must make extrea effort
>
> the non-disabled people do not have to make. Your service is discriminatory, no matter who accepts your behaviour, or where it is enacted.
>
> Dr Pamela Waugh
> > On 7 Dec 2017, at 8:20 am, Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >
> > At least in the USA, this title and many others are available through BookShare, which an initiative of the US Department of Education and operated by Benetech. It makes many books including academic titles, available for print-impaired persons (which includes not just blind and visually impaired, but folks who are dyslexic, those who can’t read because of other processing disabilities, physical disabilities, migraines, etc.).
> >
> > https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287
> >
> > I know this is a UK mailing list and that you’re in Australia, so it doesn’t help; but if there are list members in the USA, I thought you’d want to know.
> >
> > Still doesn’t excuse the high price of the book.
> >
> > Karen
> >
> >
> >> On Dec 6, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Pamela <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >>
> >> Hi,
> >>
> >> This book is of particular interest to me, as a visionimpaired author, but Iwill not be reading or buying it.
> >>
> >> I will not read it because it is advertised only in hard copy, and i will not scan it. It should be available
> >>
> >> in an electronic format. Secondly, I will not buy it because it is advertised at the price of AUD 155.
> >>
> >> The presentation of your book makes me wonder if you have any experience either as an author or as a vision-impaired persom (VIP).
> >>
> >> You must/should know the a minute percentage of VIPs are blind or sightless. Sightlessness is most people's
> >>
> >> assumption of blindness, so behave as if their assumption is correct. If you have researched disabled people's history, you must know that
> >>
> >> their stance is 'Nothing about us without us.'
> >>
> >> I hope the marketing of your book markedly improves.
> >>
> >> Dr Pamela Waugh
> >>
> >> Canberra Australia
> >>
> >>
> >>> On 7 Dec 2017, at 2:12 am, Heather Tilley <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Dear Colleagues,
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> I'm pleased to send notice of my book ‘Blindness and Writing: From Wordsworth to Gissing' which has just been published in hardback by Cambridge University Press (ISBN 9781107194212).
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> In the book I examine the huge shifts that took place in the experience and conceptualisation of blindness during the nineteenth century. Considering the ways in which visually-impaired people used texts to shape their own identities, I argue that blindness was also a means by which writers reflected on crafting literary form. The book:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> o     - Offers revisionary readings of nineteenth-century canonical authors
> >>>
> >>> o     - Extends understandings of disabled and embodied identity
> >>>
> >>> o     - Presents a range of under-researched archival material relating to the history of disability
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> For more information please visit www.cambridge.org/9781107194212
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> The book will also be made available in accessible format to all the institutions who participate in the RNIB's Bookshare programme. Cambridge University Press are also working on having a special version of the Adobe eBook produced with a ‘read out loud’ feature which will be made available for sale on their website when ready.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Many thanks
> >>>
> >>> Heather
> >>>
> >>> (Please note I am on maternity leave until the end of May 2018 so it may take me a little while to respond to any queries).
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> --
> >>> Dr Heather Tilley
> >>> Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow
> >>> Department of English and Humanities
> >>> Birkbeck, University of London
> >>> 43 Gordon Square
> >>> London WC1H 0PD
> >>>
> >>> Email: [log in to unmask]
> >>> Staff profile: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley
> >>> Projects: http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/
> >>>                https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> ________________End of message________________
> >>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
> >>>
> >>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
> >>>
> >>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
> >>>
> >>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
> >>>
> >>
> >> ________________End of message________________
> >> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
> >>
> >> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
> >>
> >> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
> >>
> >> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
> >>
> >
>
> ________________End of message________________
> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
> ________________End of message________________
> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
> ________________End of message________________
> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>
> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>
> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>
> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>
> ________________End of message________________
> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>
> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>
> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>
> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>

________________End of message________________

This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).

Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]

Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html

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------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 7 Dec 2017 07:39:59 +0000
From:    Claire Wickham <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing

Yes, here in the UK "visually impaired" is widely used by user-led groups. The contraction of visually impaired people to VIP(s) is much used and amusing as over here it also means Very Important Person.

ATB

Claire

Sent from my Sony Xperia™ smartphone

---- Karen Nakamura wrote ----

>Hiya -
>
>At least in the United States, the terminology “blind and visually impaired” is widely used. I’m not blind myself and so I try to use the terminology that communities use. I take my direction from Lighthouse and NFB — but I’m also aware that many people feel that these organizations don’t represent all blind people. In any case, when referring to any single individual, I use the term that that person prefers. What do you prefer we use for you?
>
>We should remember that not everyone will agree on language.  I belong to the  mad scholars / psychiatric disability communities and there is absolutely no consensus there on what terminology to use. If you use any term, you’re sure to offend someone.
>
>
>Warmly,
>
>Karen
>
>
>
>> On Dec 6, 2017, at 6:37 PM, Janice Ollerton <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>> I'm bemused by the term 'visually impaired'. My vision impaired friends often joke that they "don't look so bad as to be described as a visual impairment". Maybe this author needs to amend her terminology.
>>
>> Janice
>>
>> Sent from my phone
>>
>> From: The Disability-Research Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of Beth Omansky <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent: Thursday, December 7, 2017 9:47:14 AM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>>
>> I agree with Kim.  We ought to be putting pressure on publishers.  Even when a publisher offers Ebooks, it's not a guarantee the 3rd party platform will be accessible.  As authors, we ought to make sure our publishers will offer Ebook or accessible PDFs before we sign our contracts.
>>
>> BTW, Bookshare is not free to everyone in the U.S.  If you're not a student somewhere, it costs $50 per year.
>>
>> Beth
>>
>> *******************
>> “The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”   Mark Twain
>>  *****************
>> Beth Omansky, Ph.D.
>> Portland, OR
>> USA
>> [log in to unmask]
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Kim Steele <[log in to unmask]>
>> To: DISABILITY-RESEARCH <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 2:11 pm
>> Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>>
>> Unfortunately, authors have little say over the price a particular publisher sets for their books. If they did, most would make them very reasonable so more people could access them.
>>
>> According to the author, it appears that Cambridge University Press will be making some attempt at increasing accessibility for VIP via Adobe eBook. It seems that rather than castigating the author, it may make more sense to target publishers.
>>
>> Kim Steele
>>
>> -------- Original Message --------
>> Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>> From: Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]>
>> Date: Wed, December 06, 2017 1:44 pm
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>
>> I’m not being defensive. I’m neither the author nor the publisher. I just wanted to point out that at least in the USA, books through book share are free for what they call  print impaired users. I know it doesn’t help non-USA people.
>>
>> You might want to encourage your own national governments to either fund or set up their own system like Bookshare where books in accessible formats are free to blind/VI/print impaired users. It’s not perfect but you also can’t complain about free books.
>>
>> I’m actually worried as the USA federal government may defund Bookshare along with other BVI services.
>>
>>
>> Karen Nakamura (she/her/hers)
>> Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and Professor of Anthropology
>> Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology
>> University of California Berkeley
>> [log in to unmask]
>> disability.jp/nakamura
>> From: Pamela <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:27:01 PM
>> To: Karen Nakamura
>> Cc: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>>
>> Your defensive statements do not hold water. The book should be accessible. Accessibility does not mean disable people must make extrea effort
>>
>> the non-disabled people do not have to make. Your service is discriminatory, no matter who accepts your behaviour, or where it is enacted.
>>
>> Dr Pamela Waugh
>> > On 7 Dec 2017, at 8:20 am, Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> >
>> > At least in the USA, this title and many others are available through BookShare, which an initiative of the US Department of Education and operated by Benetech. It makes many books including academic titles, available for print-impaired persons (which includes not just blind and visually impaired, but folks who are dyslexic, those who can’t read because of other processing disabilities, physical disabilities, migraines, etc.).
>> >
>> > https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287
>> >
>> > I know this is a UK mailing list and that you’re in Australia, so it doesn’t help; but if there are list members in the USA, I thought you’d want to know.
>> >
>> > Still doesn’t excuse the high price of the book.
>> >
>> > Karen
>> >
>> >
>> >> On Dec 6, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Pamela <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> Hi,
>> >>
>> >> This book is of particular interest to me, as a visionimpaired author, but Iwill not be reading or buying it.
>> >>
>> >> I will not read it because it is advertised only in hard copy, and i will not scan it. It should be available
>> >>
>> >> in an electronic format. Secondly, I will not buy it because it is advertised at the price of AUD 155.
>> >>
>> >> The presentation of your book makes me wonder if you have any experience either as an author or as a vision-impaired persom (VIP).
>> >>
>> >> You must/should know the a minute percentage of VIPs are blind or sightless. Sightlessness is most people's
>> >>
>> >> assumption of blindness, so behave as if their assumption is correct. If you have researched disabled people's history, you must know that
>> >>
>> >> their stance is 'Nothing about us without us.'
>> >>
>> >> I hope the marketing of your book markedly improves.
>> >>
>> >> Dr Pamela Waugh
>> >>
>> >> Canberra Australia
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>> On 7 Dec 2017, at 2:12 am, Heather Tilley <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>> Dear Colleagues,
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> I'm pleased to send notice of my book ‘Blindness and Writing: From Wordsworth to Gissing' which has just been published in hardback by Cambridge University Press (ISBN 9781107194212).
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> In the book I examine the huge shifts that took place in the experience and conceptualisation of blindness during the nineteenth century. Considering the ways in which visually-impaired people used texts to shape their own identities, I argue that blindness was also a means by which writers reflected on crafting literary form. The book:
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> o     - Offers revisionary readings of nineteenth-century canonical authors
>> >>>
>> >>> o     - Extends understandings of disabled and embodied identity
>> >>>
>> >>> o     - Presents a range of under-researched archival material relating to the history of disability
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> For more information please visit www.cambridge.org/9781107194212
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> The book will also be made available in accessible format to all the institutions who participate in the RNIB's Bookshare programme. Cambridge University Press are also working on having a special version of the Adobe eBook produced with a ‘read out loud’ feature which will be made available for sale on their website when ready.
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> Many thanks
>> >>>
>> >>> Heather
>> >>>
>> >>> (Please note I am on maternity leave until the end of May 2018 so it may take me a little while to respond to any queries).
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> --
>> >>> Dr Heather Tilley
>> >>> Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow
>> >>> Department of English and Humanities
>> >>> Birkbeck, University of London
>> >>> 43 Gordon Square
>> >>> London WC1H 0PD
>> >>>
>> >>> Email: [log in to unmask]
>> >>> Staff profile: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley
>> >>> Projects: http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/
>> >>>                https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> ________________End of message________________
>> >>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> >>>
>> >>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>> >>>
>> >>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>> >>>
>> >>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>> >>>
>> >>
>> >> ________________End of message________________
>> >> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> >>
>> >> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>> >>
>> >> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>> >>
>> >> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>> >>
>> >
>>
>> ________________End of message________________
>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>> ________________End of message________________
>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>
>> *******************
>> “The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”   Mark Twain
>>  *****************
>> Beth Omansky, Ph.D.
>> Portland, OR
>> USA
>> [log in to unmask]
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Kim Steele <[log in to unmask]>
>> To: DISABILITY-RESEARCH <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 2:11 pm
>> Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>>
>> Unfortunately, authors have little say over the price a particular publisher sets for their books. If they did, most would make them very reasonable so more people could access them.
>>
>> According to the author, it appears that Cambridge University Press will be making some attempt at increasing accessibility for VIP via Adobe eBook. It seems that rather than castigating the author, it may make more sense to target publishers.
>>
>> Kim Steele
>>
>> -------- Original Message --------
>> Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>> From: Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]>
>> Date: Wed, December 06, 2017 1:44 pm
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>
>> I’m not being defensive. I’m neither the author nor the publisher. I just wanted to point out that at least in the USA, books through book share are free for what they call  print impaired users. I know it doesn’t help non-USA people.
>>
>> You might want to encourage your own national governments to either fund or set up their own system like Bookshare where books in accessible formats are free to blind/VI/print impaired users. It’s not perfect but you also can’t complain about free books.
>>
>> I’m actually worried as the USA federal government may defund Bookshare along with other BVI services.
>>
>>
>> Karen Nakamura (she/her/hers)
>> Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and Professor of Anthropology
>> Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology
>> University of California Berkeley
>> [log in to unmask]
>> disability.jp/nakamura
>> From: Pamela <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:27:01 PM
>> To: Karen Nakamura
>> Cc: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>>
>> Your defensive statements do not hold water. The book should be accessible. Accessibility does not mean disable people must make extrea effort
>>
>> the non-disabled people do not have to make. Your service is discriminatory, no matter who accepts your behaviour, or where it is enacted.
>>
>> Dr Pamela Waugh
>> > On 7 Dec 2017, at 8:20 am, Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> >
>> > At least in the USA, this title and many others are available through BookShare, which an initiative of the US Department of Education and operated by Benetech. It makes many books including academic titles, available for print-impaired persons (which includes not just blind and visually impaired, but folks who are dyslexic, those who can’t read because of other processing disabilities, physical disabilities, migraines, etc.).
>> >
>> > https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287
>> >
>> > I know this is a UK mailing list and that you’re in Australia, so it doesn’t help; but if there are list members in the USA, I thought you’d want to know.
>> >
>> > Still doesn’t excuse the high price of the book.
>> >
>> > Karen
>> >
>> >
>> >> On Dec 6, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Pamela <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> Hi,
>> >>
>> >> This book is of particular interest to me, as a visionimpaired author, but Iwill not be reading or buying it.
>> >>
>> >> I will not read it because it is advertised only in hard copy, and i will not scan it. It should be available
>> >>
>> >> in an electronic format. Secondly, I will not buy it because it is advertised at the price of AUD 155.
>> >>
>> >> The presentation of your book makes me wonder if you have any experience either as an author or as a vision-impaired persom (VIP).
>> >>
>> >> You must/should know the a minute percentage of VIPs are blind or sightless. Sightlessness is most people's
>> >>
>> >> assumption of blindness, so behave as if their assumption is correct. If you have researched disabled people's history, you must know that
>> >>
>> >> their stance is 'Nothing about us without us.'
>> >>
>> >> I hope the marketing of your book markedly improves.
>> >>
>> >> Dr Pamela Waugh
>> >>
>> >> Canberra Australia
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>> On 7 Dec 2017, at 2:12 am, Heather Tilley <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>> Dear Colleagues,
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> I'm pleased to send notice of my book ‘Blindness and Writing: From Wordsworth to Gissing' which has just been published in hardback by Cambridge University Press (ISBN 9781107194212).
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> In the book I examine the huge shifts that took place in the experience and conceptualisation of blindness during the nineteenth century. Considering the ways in which visually-impaired people used texts to shape their own identities, I argue that blindness was also a means by which writers reflected on crafting literary form. The book:
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> o     - Offers revisionary readings of nineteenth-century canonical authors
>> >>>
>> >>> o     - Extends understandings of disabled and embodied identity
>> >>>
>> >>> o     - Presents a range of under-researched archival material relating to the history of disability
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> For more information please visit www.cambridge.org/9781107194212
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> The book will also be made available in accessible format to all the institutions who participate in the RNIB's Bookshare programme. Cambridge University Press are also working on having a special version of the Adobe eBook produced with a ‘read out loud’ feature which will be made available for sale on their website when ready.
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> Many thanks
>> >>>
>> >>> Heather
>> >>>
>> >>> (Please note I am on maternity leave until the end of May 2018 so it may take me a little while to respond to any queries).
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> --
>> >>> Dr Heather Tilley
>> >>> Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow
>> >>> Department of English and Humanities
>> >>> Birkbeck, University of London
>> >>> 43 Gordon Square
>> >>> London WC1H 0PD
>> >>>
>> >>> Email: [log in to unmask]
>> >>> Staff profile: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley
>> >>> Projects: http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/
>> >>>                https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> ________________End of message________________
>> >>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> >>>
>> >>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>> >>>
>> >>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>> >>>
>> >>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>> >>>
>> >>
>> >> ________________End of message________________
>> >> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> >>
>> >> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>> >>
>> >> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>> >>
>> >> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>> >>
>> >
>>
>> ________________End of message________________
>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>> ________________End of message________________
>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>> ________________End of message________________
>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>>
>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>>
>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>>
>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>
>> ________________End of message________________
>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>>
>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>>
>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>>
>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>
>
>________________End of message________________
>
>This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>
>Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>
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>
>You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.


________________End of message________________

This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).

Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]

Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html

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------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 7 Dec 2017 09:34:57 -0500
From:    Karlen Communications <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: BOOK ACCESS   RE: [DISABILITY-RESEARCH] New book, Blindness and Writing

I’d contact the Disability Services or alternate format production people within your academic organizations as there is a concerted effort to work with publishers to ensure that publications are accessible.



Several universities have purchased a  new model of textbook distribution called “inclusive access” which provides students with a digital copy of the books for courses but I can’t find anything in the description of this new model to indicate that the digital copies are going to be accessible.



I know the larger publishing houses like Pearson and McGraw-Hill are investing in accessible textbooks and books used in academic environments although the process is slow. Elsevier is also working to make digital journal publications accessible.



I’m suggesting contacting those already involved in the process because publishers will want to know what format you want as they try to consolidate requests/legal obligations. I’ve been a part of this movement for over a decade and it began with each academic organization wanting different formats. Publishers aren’t going to do this which is how we ended up with a more consolidated effort to identify something like a PDF/UA tagged PDF document and/or EPUB 3 format (which now has accessibility criteria thanks to the W3C).



I can give you some contacts if you want them off-list.



Cheers, Karen



From: The Disability-Research Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Devva Kasnitz
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 6:17 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: BOOK ACCESS RE: [DISABILITY-RESEARCH] New book, Blindness and Writing



I just added this to the SDS list as well. SDS has a Research and Publications Committee and a Policy (external) Committee. Both of these could use volunteers. I personally think that this issue is ripe for some acton. Speaking as an individual, it would not be inappropriate for SDS to work both within our membership and with disability studies organizations elsewhere to put together some minimum standards for publication access and to bring it to the publishing industry.





Devva Kasnitz, PhD

Adj Professor, City University of New York—School of Professional Studies—Disability Studies

Executive Director, Society for Disability Studies, PO BOX 5570, Eureka CA 95502



From: The Disability-Research Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Beth Omansky
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 2:47 PM
To: [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [DISABILITY-RESEARCH] New book, Blindness and Writing



I agree with Kim.  We ought to be putting pressure on publishers.  Even when a publisher offers Ebooks, it's not a guarantee the 3rd party platform will be accessible.  As authors, we ought to make sure our publishers will offer Ebook or accessible PDFs before we sign our contracts.



BTW, Bookshare is not free to everyone in the U.S.  If you're not a student somewhere, it costs $50 per year.



Beth



*******************

“The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”   Mark Twain
 *****************

Beth Omansky, Ph.D.

Portland, OR

USA

[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>







-----Original Message-----
From: Kim Steele <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> >
To: DISABILITY-RESEARCH <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> >
Sent: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 2:11 pm
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing

Unfortunately, authors have little say over the price a particular publisher sets for their books. If they did, most would make them very reasonable so more people could access them.



According to the author, it appears that Cambridge University Press will be making some attempt at increasing accessibility for VIP via Adobe eBook. It seems that rather than castigating the author, it may make more sense to target publishers.



Kim Steele



-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
From: Karen Nakamura < <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]>
Date: Wed, December 06, 2017 1:44 pm
To:  <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]

I’m not being defensive. I’m neither the author nor the publisher. I just wanted to point out that at least in the USA, books through book share are free for what they call  print impaired users. I know it doesn’t help non-USA people.



You might want to encourage your own national governments to either fund or set up their own system like Bookshare where books in accessible formats are free to blind/VI/print impaired users. It’s not perfect but you also can’t complain about free books.



I’m actually worried as the USA federal government may defund Bookshare along with other BVI services.





Karen Nakamura (she/her/hers)

Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and Professor of Anthropology

Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology

University of California Berkeley

 <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]

 <http://disability.jp/nakamura> disability.jp/nakamura


  _____


From: Pamela < <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]>
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:27:01 PM
To: Karen Nakamura
Cc:  <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing



Your defensive statements do not hold water. The book should be accessible. Accessibility does not mean disable people must make extrea effort

the non-disabled people do not have to make. Your service is discriminatory, no matter who accepts your behaviour, or where it is enacted.

Dr Pamela Waugh
> On 7 Dec 2017, at 8:20 am, Karen Nakamura < <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> At least in the USA, this title and many others are available through BookShare, which an initiative of the US Department of Education and operated by Benetech. It makes many books including academic titles, available for print-impaired persons (which includes not just blind and visually impaired, but folks who are dyslexic, those who can’t read because of other processing disabilities, physical disabilities, migraines, etc.).
>
>  <https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287> https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287
>
> I know this is a UK mailing list and that you’re in Australia, so it doesn’t help; but if there are list members in the USA, I thought you’d want to know.
>
> Still doesn’t excuse the high price of the book.
>
> Karen
>
>
>> On Dec 6, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Pamela < <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> This book is of particular interest to me, as a visionimpaired author, but Iwill not be reading or buying it.
>>
>> I will not read it because it is advertised only in hard copy, and i will not scan it. It should be available
>>
>> in an electronic format. Secondly, I will not buy it because it is advertised at the price of AUD 155.
>>
>> The presentation of your book makes me wonder if you have any experience either as an author or as a vision-impaired persom (VIP).
>>
>> You must/should know the a minute percentage of VIPs are blind or sightless. Sightlessness is most people's
>>
>> assumption of blindness, so behave as if their assumption is correct. If you have researched disabled people's history, you must know that
>>
>> their stance is 'Nothing about us without us.'
>>
>> I hope the marketing of your book markedly improves.
>>
>> Dr Pamela Waugh
>>
>> Canberra Australia
>>
>>
>>> On 7 Dec 2017, at 2:12 am, Heather Tilley < <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>
>>> Dear Colleagues,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I'm pleased to send notice of my book ‘Blindness and Writing: From Wordsworth to Gissing' which has just been published in hardback by Cambridge University Press (ISBN 9781107194212).
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> In the book I examine the huge shifts that took place in the experience and conceptualisation of blindness during the nineteenth century. Considering the ways in which visually-impaired people used texts to shape their own identities, I argue that blindness was also a means by which writers reflected on crafting literary form. The book:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> o     - Offers revisionary readings of nineteenth-century canonical authors
>>>
>>> o     - Extends understandings of disabled and embodied identity
>>>
>>> o     - Presents a range of under-researched archival material relating to the history of disability
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> For more information please visit  <http://www.cambridge.org/9781107194212> www.cambridge.org/9781107194212
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> The book will also be made available in accessible format to all the institutions who participate in the RNIB's Bookshare programme. Cambridge University Press are also working on having a special version of the Adobe eBook produced with a ‘read out loud’ feature which will be made available for sale on their website when ready.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Many thanks
>>>
>>> Heather
>>>
>>> (Please note I am on maternity leave until the end of May 2018 so it may take me a little while to respond to any queries).
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Dr Heather Tilley
>>> Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow
>>> Department of English and Humanities
>>> Birkbeck, University of London
>>> 43 Gordon Square
>>> London WC1H 0PD
>>>
>>> Email:  <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]
>>> Staff profile:  <http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley> http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley
>>> Projects:  <http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/> http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/
>>>                 <https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/> https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ________________End of message________________
>>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds ( <http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies> www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>>>
>>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to  <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]
>>>
>>> Archives and tools are located at:  <http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html> www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>>>
>>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>>
>>
>> ________________End of message________________
>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds ( <http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies> www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>>
>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to  <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]
>>
>> Archives and tools are located at:  <http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html> www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>>
>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>
>

________________End of message________________

This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds ( <http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies> www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).

Enquiries about list administration should be sent to  <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]

Archives and tools are located at:  <http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html> www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html

You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.

________________End of message________________

This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds ( <http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies> www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).

Enquiries about list administration should be sent to  <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]

Archives and tools are located at:  <http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html> www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html

You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.



*******************

“The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”   Mark Twain
 *****************

Beth Omansky, Ph.D.

Portland, OR

USA

[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>







-----Original Message-----
From: Kim Steele <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> >
To: DISABILITY-RESEARCH <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> >
Sent: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 2:11 pm
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing

Unfortunately, authors have little say over the price a particular publisher sets for their books. If they did, most would make them very reasonable so more people could access them.



According to the author, it appears that Cambridge University Press will be making some attempt at increasing accessibility for VIP via Adobe eBook. It seems that rather than castigating the author, it may make more sense to target publishers.



Kim Steele



-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
From: Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> >
Date: Wed, December 06, 2017 1:44 pm
To: [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>

I’m not being defensive. I’m neither the author nor the publisher. I just wanted to point out that at least in the USA, books through book share are free for what they call  print impaired users. I know it doesn’t help non-USA people.



You might want to encourage your own national governments to either fund or set up their own system like Bookshare where books in accessible formats are free to blind/VI/print impaired users. It’s not perfect but you also can’t complain about free books.



I’m actually worried as the USA federal government may defund Bookshare along with other BVI services.





Karen Nakamura (she/her/hers)

Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and Professor of Anthropology

Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology

University of California Berkeley

[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>

disability.jp/nakamura


  _____


From: Pamela <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> >
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:27:01 PM
To: Karen Nakamura
Cc: [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing



Your defensive statements do not hold water. The book should be accessible. Accessibility does not mean disable people must make extrea effort

the non-disabled people do not have to make. Your service is discriminatory, no matter who accepts your behaviour, or where it is enacted.

Dr Pamela Waugh
> On 7 Dec 2017, at 8:20 am, Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> > wrote:
>
> At least in the USA, this title and many others are available through BookShare, which an initiative of the US Department of Education and operated by Benetech. It makes many books including academic titles, available for print-impaired persons (which includes not just blind and visually impaired, but folks who are dyslexic, those who can’t read because of other processing disabilities, physical disabilities, migraines, etc.).
>
> https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287
>
> I know this is a UK mailing list and that you’re in Australia, so it doesn’t help; but if there are list members in the USA, I thought you’d want to know.
>
> Still doesn’t excuse the high price of the book.
>
> Karen
>
>
>> On Dec 6, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Pamela <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> > wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> This book is of particular interest to me, as a visionimpaired author, but Iwill not be reading or buying it.
>>
>> I will not read it because it is advertised only in hard copy, and i will not scan it. It should be available
>>
>> in an electronic format. Secondly, I will not buy it because it is advertised at the price of AUD 155.
>>
>> The presentation of your book makes me wonder if you have any experience either as an author or as a vision-impaired persom (VIP).
>>
>> You must/should know the a minute percentage of VIPs are blind or sightless. Sightlessness is most people's
>>
>> assumption of blindness, so behave as if their assumption is correct. If you have researched disabled people's history, you must know that
>>
>> their stance is 'Nothing about us without us.'
>>
>> I hope the marketing of your book markedly improves.
>>
>> Dr Pamela Waugh
>>
>> Canberra Australia
>>
>>
>>> On 7 Dec 2017, at 2:12 am, Heather Tilley <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> > wrote:
>>>
>>> Dear Colleagues,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I'm pleased to send notice of my book ‘Blindness and Writing: From Wordsworth to Gissing' which has just been published in hardback by Cambridge University Press (ISBN 9781107194212).
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> In the book I examine the huge shifts that took place in the experience and conceptualisation of blindness during the nineteenth century. Considering the ways in which visually-impaired people used texts to shape their own identities, I argue that blindness was also a means by which writers reflected on crafting literary form. The book:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> o     - Offers revisionary readings of nineteenth-century canonical authors
>>>
>>> o     - Extends understandings of disabled and embodied identity
>>>
>>> o     - Presents a range of under-researched archival material relating to the history of disability
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> For more information please visit www.cambridge.org/9781107194212 <http://www.cambridge.org/9781107194212>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> The book will also be made available in accessible format to all the institutions who participate in the RNIB's Bookshare programme. Cambridge University Press are also working on having a special version of the Adobe eBook produced with a ‘read out loud’ feature which will be made available for sale on their website when ready.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Many thanks
>>>
>>> Heather
>>>
>>> (Please note I am on maternity leave until the end of May 2018 so it may take me a little while to respond to any queries).
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Dr Heather Tilley
>>> Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow
>>> Department of English and Humanities
>>> Birkbeck, University of London
>>> 43 Gordon Square
>>> London WC1H 0PD
>>>
>>> Email: [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>> Staff profile: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley
>>> Projects: http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/
>>>                https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ________________End of message________________
>>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies <http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies> ).
>>>
>>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>>
>>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html <http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html>
>>>
>>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>>
>>
>> ________________End of message________________
>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies <http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies> ).
>>
>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>
>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html <http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html>
>>
>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>
>

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------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 7 Dec 2017 16:35:06 +0100
From:    Simo Vehmas <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: SJDR open access

Apologies for cross-posting

Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research transition to open access:

http://nndr.no/greetings-from-nndr-to-scandinavian-journal-of-disability-research-on-its-transition-to-an-open-access-publication/

Best, Simo Vehmas

________________End of message________________

This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).

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------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 7 Dec 2017 17:32:32 +0000
From:    laura welti <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing

I try to say vision impaired rather than visually impaired, specifically to
avoid that problem.

Laura

On 7 December 2017 at 03:03, Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Hiya -
>
> At least in the United States, the terminology “blind and visually
> impaired” is widely used. I’m not blind myself and so I try to use the
> terminology that communities use. I take my direction from Lighthouse and
> NFB — but I’m also aware that many people feel that these organizations
> don’t represent all blind people. In any case, when referring to any single
> individual, I use the term that that person prefers. What do you prefer we
> use for you?
>
> We should remember that not everyone will agree on language.  I belong to
> the  mad scholars / psychiatric disability communities and there is
> absolutely no consensus there on what terminology to use. If you use any
> term, you’re sure to offend someone.
>
>
> Warmly,
>
> Karen
>
>
>
> > On Dec 6, 2017, at 6:37 PM, Janice Ollerton <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> >
> > I'm bemused by the term 'visually impaired'. My vision impaired friends
> often joke that they "don't look so bad as to be described as a visual
> impairment". Maybe this author needs to amend her terminology.
> >
> > Janice
> >
> > Sent from my phone
> >
> > From: The Disability-Research Discussion List <
> [log in to unmask]> on behalf of Beth Omansky <
> [log in to unmask]>
> > Sent: Thursday, December 7, 2017 9:47:14 AM
> > To: [log in to unmask]
> > Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
> >
> > I agree with Kim.  We ought to be putting pressure on publishers.  Even
> when a publisher offers Ebooks, it's not a guarantee the 3rd party platform
> will be accessible.  As authors, we ought to make sure our publishers will
> offer Ebook or accessible PDFs before we sign our contracts.
> >
> > BTW, Bookshare is not free to everyone in the U.S.  If you're not a
> student somewhere, it costs $50 per year.
> >
> > Beth
> >
> > *******************
> > “The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”   Mark Twain
> >  *****************
> > Beth Omansky, Ph.D.
> > Portland, OR
> > USA
> > [log in to unmask]
> >
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Kim Steele <[log in to unmask]>
> > To: DISABILITY-RESEARCH <[log in to unmask]>
> > Sent: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 2:11 pm
> > Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
> >
> > Unfortunately, authors have little say over the price a particular
> publisher sets for their books. If they did, most would make them very
> reasonable so more people could access them.
> >
> > According to the author, it appears that Cambridge University Press will
> be making some attempt at increasing accessibility for VIP via Adobe eBook.
> It seems that rather than castigating the author, it may make more sense to
> target publishers.
> >
> > Kim Steele
> >
> > -------- Original Message --------
> > Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
> > From: Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]>
> > Date: Wed, December 06, 2017 1:44 pm
> > To: [log in to unmask]
> >
> > I’m not being defensive. I’m neither the author nor the publisher. I
> just wanted to point out that at least in the USA, books through book share
> are free for what they call  print impaired users. I know it doesn’t help
> non-USA people.
> >
> > You might want to encourage your own national governments to either fund
> or set up their own system like Bookshare where books in accessible formats
> are free to blind/VI/print impaired users. It’s not perfect but you also
> can’t complain about free books.
> >
> > I’m actually worried as the USA federal government may defund Bookshare
> along with other BVI services.
> >
> >
> > Karen Nakamura (she/her/hers)
> > Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and
> Professor of Anthropology
> > Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology
> > University of California Berkeley
> > [log in to unmask]
> > disability.jp/nakamura
> > From: Pamela <[log in to unmask]>
> > Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:27:01 PM
> > To: Karen Nakamura
> > Cc: [log in to unmask]
> > Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
> >
> > Your defensive statements do not hold water. The book should be
> accessible. Accessibility does not mean disable people must make extrea
> effort
> >
> > the non-disabled people do not have to make. Your service is
> discriminatory, no matter who accepts your behaviour, or where it is
> enacted.
> >
> > Dr Pamela Waugh
> > > On 7 Dec 2017, at 8:20 am, Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > >
> > > At least in the USA, this title and many others are available through
> BookShare, which an initiative of the US Department of Education and
> operated by Benetech. It makes many books including academic titles,
> available for print-impaired persons (which includes not just blind and
> visually impaired, but folks who are dyslexic, those who can’t read because
> of other processing disabilities, physical disabilities, migraines, etc.).
> > >
> > > https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287
> > >
> > > I know this is a UK mailing list and that you’re in Australia, so it
> doesn’t help; but if there are list members in the USA, I thought you’d
> want to know.
> > >
> > > Still doesn’t excuse the high price of the book.
> > >
> > > Karen
> > >
> > >
> > >> On Dec 6, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Pamela <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > >>
> > >> Hi,
> > >>
> > >> This book is of particular interest to me, as a visionimpaired
> author, but Iwill not be reading or buying it.
> > >>
> > >> I will not read it because it is advertised only in hard copy, and i
> will not scan it. It should be available
> > >>
> > >> in an electronic format. Secondly, I will not buy it because it is
> advertised at the price of AUD 155.
> > >>
> > >> The presentation of your book makes me wonder if you have any
> experience either as an author or as a vision-impaired persom (VIP).
> > >>
> > >> You must/should know the a minute percentage of VIPs are blind or
> sightless. Sightlessness is most people's
> > >>
> > >> assumption of blindness, so behave as if their assumption is correct.
> If you have researched disabled people's history, you must know that
> > >>
> > >> their stance is 'Nothing about us without us.'
> > >>
> > >> I hope the marketing of your book markedly improves.
> > >>
> > >> Dr Pamela Waugh
> > >>
> > >> Canberra Australia
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>> On 7 Dec 2017, at 2:12 am, Heather Tilley <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> > >>>
> > >>> Dear Colleagues,
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> I'm pleased to send notice of my book ‘Blindness and Writing: From
> Wordsworth to Gissing' which has just been published in hardback by
> Cambridge University Press (ISBN 9781107194212).
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> In the book I examine the huge shifts that took place in the
> experience and conceptualisation of blindness during the nineteenth
> century. Considering the ways in which visually-impaired people used texts
> to shape their own identities, I argue that blindness was also a means by
> which writers reflected on crafting literary form. The book:
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> o     - Offers revisionary readings of nineteenth-century canonical
> authors
> > >>>
> > >>> o     - Extends understandings of disabled and embodied identity
> > >>>
> > >>> o     - Presents a range of under-researched archival material
> relating to the history of disability
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> For more information please visit www.cambridge.org/9781107194212
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> The book will also be made available in accessible format to all the
> institutions who participate in the RNIB's Bookshare programme. Cambridge
> University Press are also working on having a special version of the Adobe
> eBook produced with a ‘read out loud’ feature which will be made available
> for sale on their website when ready.
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> Many thanks
> > >>>
> > >>> Heather
> > >>>
> > >>> (Please note I am on maternity leave until the end of May 2018 so it
> may take me a little while to respond to any queries).
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> --
> > >>> Dr Heather Tilley
> > >>> Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow
> > >>> Department of English and Humanities
> > >>> Birkbeck, University of London
> > >>> 43 Gordon Square
> > >>> London WC1H 0PD
> > >>>
> > >>> Email: [log in to unmask]
> > >>> Staff profile: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/
> our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley
> > >>> Projects: http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/
> > >>>                https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> ________________End of message________________
> > >>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre
> for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (
> www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
> > >>>
> > >>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to
> [log in to unmask]
> > >>>
> > >>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/
> disability-research.html
> > >>>
> > >>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this
> web page.
> > >>>
> > >>
> > >> ________________End of message________________
> > >> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for
> Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-
> studies).
> > >>
> > >> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to
> [log in to unmask]
> > >>
> > >> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/
> disability-research.html
> > >>
> > >> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web
> page.
> > >>
> > >
> >
> > ________________End of message________________
> > This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for
> Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-
> studies).
> > Enquiries about list administration should be sent to
> [log in to unmask]
> > Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/
> disability-research.html
> > You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web
> page.
> > ________________End of message________________
> > This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for
> Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-
> studies).
> > Enquiries about list administration should be sent to
> [log in to unmask]
> > Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/
> disability-research.html
> > You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web
> page.
> >
> > *******************
> > “The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”   Mark Twain
> >  *****************
> > Beth Omansky, Ph.D.
> > Portland, OR
> > USA
> > [log in to unmask]
> >
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Kim Steele <[log in to unmask]>
> > To: DISABILITY-RESEARCH <[log in to unmask]>
> > Sent: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 2:11 pm
> > Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
> >
> > Unfortunately, authors have little say over the price a particular
> publisher sets for their books. If they did, most would make them very
> reasonable so more people could access them.
> >
> > According to the author, it appears that Cambridge University Press will
> be making some attempt at increasing accessibility for VIP via Adobe eBook.
> It seems that rather than castigating the author, it may make more sense to
> target publishers.
> >
> > Kim Steele
> >
> > -------- Original Message --------
> > Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
> > From: Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]>
> > Date: Wed, December 06, 2017 1:44 pm
> > To: [log in to unmask]
> >
> > I’m not being defensive. I’m neither the author nor the publisher. I
> just wanted to point out that at least in the USA, books through book share
> are free for what they call  print impaired users. I know it doesn’t help
> non-USA people.
> >
> > You might want to encourage your own national governments to either fund
> or set up their own system like Bookshare where books in accessible formats
> are free to blind/VI/print impaired users. It’s not perfect but you also
> can’t complain about free books.
> >
> > I’m actually worried as the USA federal government may defund Bookshare
> along with other BVI services.
> >
> >
> > Karen Nakamura (she/her/hers)
> > Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and
> Professor of Anthropology
> > Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology
> > University of California Berkeley
> > [log in to unmask]
> > disability.jp/nakamura
> > From: Pamela <[log in to unmask]>
> > Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:27:01 PM
> > To: Karen Nakamura
> > Cc: [log in to unmask]
> > Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
> >
> > Your defensive statements do not hold water. The book should be
> accessible. Accessibility does not mean disable people must make extrea
> effort
> >
> > the non-disabled people do not have to make. Your service is
> discriminatory, no matter who accepts your behaviour, or where it is
> enacted.
> >
> > Dr Pamela Waugh
> > > On 7 Dec 2017, at 8:20 am, Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > >
> > > At least in the USA, this title and many others are available through
> BookShare, which an initiative of the US Department of Education and
> operated by Benetech. It makes many books including academic titles,
> available for print-impaired persons (which includes not just blind and
> visually impaired, but folks who are dyslexic, those who can’t read because
> of other processing disabilities, physical disabilities, migraines, etc.).
> > >
> > > https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287
> > >
> > > I know this is a UK mailing list and that you’re in Australia, so it
> doesn’t help; but if there are list members in the USA, I thought you’d
> want to know.
> > >
> > > Still doesn’t excuse the high price of the book.
> > >
> > > Karen
> > >
> > >
> > >> On Dec 6, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Pamela <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > >>
> > >> Hi,
> > >>
> > >> This book is of particular interest to me, as a visionimpaired
> author, but Iwill not be reading or buying it.
> > >>
> > >> I will not read it because it is advertised only in hard copy, and i
> will not scan it. It should be available
> > >>
> > >> in an electronic format. Secondly, I will not buy it because it is
> advertised at the price of AUD 155.
> > >>
> > >> The presentation of your book makes me wonder if you have any
> experience either as an author or as a vision-impaired persom (VIP).
> > >>
> > >> You must/should know the a minute percentage of VIPs are blind or
> sightless. Sightlessness is most people's
> > >>
> > >> assumption of blindness, so behave as if their assumption is correct.
> If you have researched disabled people's history, you must know that
> > >>
> > >> their stance is 'Nothing about us without us.'
> > >>
> > >> I hope the marketing of your book markedly improves.
> > >>
> > >> Dr Pamela Waugh
> > >>
> > >> Canberra Australia
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>> On 7 Dec 2017, at 2:12 am, Heather Tilley <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> > >>>
> > >>> Dear Colleagues,
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> I'm pleased to send notice of my book ‘Blindness and Writing: From
> Wordsworth to Gissing' which has just been published in hardback by
> Cambridge University Press (ISBN 9781107194212).
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> In the book I examine the huge shifts that took place in the
> experience and conceptualisation of blindness during the nineteenth
> century. Considering the ways in which visually-impaired people used texts
> to shape their own identities, I argue that blindness was also a means by
> which writers reflected on crafting literary form. The book:
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> o     - Offers revisionary readings of nineteenth-century canonical
> authors
> > >>>
> > >>> o     - Extends understandings of disabled and embodied identity
> > >>>
> > >>> o     - Presents a range of under-researched archival material
> relating to the history of disability
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> For more information please visit www.cambridge.org/9781107194212
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> The book will also be made available in accessible format to all the
> institutions who participate in the RNIB's Bookshare programme. Cambridge
> University Press are also working on having a special version of the Adobe
> eBook produced with a ‘read out loud’ feature which will be made available
> for sale on their website when ready.
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> Many thanks
> > >>>
> > >>> Heather
> > >>>
> > >>> (Please note I am on maternity leave until the end of May 2018 so it
> may take me a little while to respond to any queries).
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> --
> > >>> Dr Heather Tilley
> > >>> Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow
> > >>> Department of English and Humanities
> > >>> Birkbeck, University of London
> > >>> 43 Gordon Square
> > >>> London WC1H 0PD
> > >>>
> > >>> Email: [log in to unmask]
> > >>> Staff profile: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/
> our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley
> > >>> Projects: http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/
> > >>>                https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> ________________End of message________________
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------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 7 Dec 2017 09:37:13 -0800
From:    Devva Kasnitz <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: BOOK ACCESS   RE: [DISABILITY-RESEARCH] New book, Blindness and Writing

I also just added this to the AHEAD list as well. I personally think that this issue is ripe for some acton.



Speaking as an individual, it would not be inappropriate for SDS/AHEAD/Others to work both within our membership and with disability studies organizations elsewhere to put together some minimum standards for publication access and to bring it to school admin and the publishing industry.



We could (try/join/threaten to start (?) a movement to have ALL faculty and even whole schools pledge to NOT assign books for purchase if……………..





Devva Kasnitz, PhD

Adj Professor, City University of New York—School of Professional Studies—Disability Studies

Executive Director, Society for Disability Studies, PO BOX 5570, Eureka CA 95502



From: The Disability-Research Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Karlen Communications
Sent: Thursday, December 7, 2017 6:35 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [DISABILITY-RESEARCH] BOOK ACCESS RE: [DISABILITY-RESEARCH] New book, Blindness and Writing



I’d contact the Disability Services or alternate format production people within your academic organizations as there is a concerted effort to work with publishers to ensure that publications are accessible.



Several universities have purchased a  new model of textbook distribution called “inclusive access” which provides students with a digital copy of the books for courses but I can’t find anything in the description of this new model to indicate that the digital copies are going to be accessible.



I know the larger publishing houses like Pearson and McGraw-Hill are investing in accessible textbooks and books used in academic environments although the process is slow. Elsevier is also working to make digital journal publications accessible.



I’m suggesting contacting those already involved in the process because publishers will want to know what format you want as they try to consolidate requests/legal obligations. I’ve been a part of this movement for over a decade and it began with each academic organization wanting different formats. Publishers aren’t going to do this which is how we ended up with a more consolidated effort to identify something like a PDF/UA tagged PDF document and/or EPUB 3 format (which now has accessibility criteria thanks to the W3C).



I can give you some contacts if you want them off-list.



Cheers, Karen



From: The Disability-Research Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Devva Kasnitz
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 6:17 PM
To: [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Subject: BOOK ACCESS RE: [DISABILITY-RESEARCH] New book, Blindness and Writing



I just added this to the SDS list as well. SDS has a Research and Publications Committee and a Policy (external) Committee. Both of these could use volunteers. I personally think that this issue is ripe for some acton. Speaking as an individual, it would not be inappropriate for SDS to work both within our membership and with disability studies organizations elsewhere to put together some minimum standards for publication access and to bring it to the publishing industry.





Devva Kasnitz, PhD

Adj Professor, City University of New York—School of Professional Studies—Disability Studies

Executive Director, Society for Disability Studies, PO BOX 5570, Eureka CA 95502



From: The Disability-Research Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Beth Omansky
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 2:47 PM
To: [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [DISABILITY-RESEARCH] New book, Blindness and Writing



I agree with Kim.  We ought to be putting pressure on publishers.  Even when a publisher offers Ebooks, it's not a guarantee the 3rd party platform will be accessible.  As authors, we ought to make sure our publishers will offer Ebook or accessible PDFs before we sign our contracts.



BTW, Bookshare is not free to everyone in the U.S.  If you're not a student somewhere, it costs $50 per year.



Beth



*******************

“The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”   Mark Twain
 *****************

Beth Omansky, Ph.D.

Portland, OR

USA

[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>







-----Original Message-----
From: Kim Steele <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> >
To: DISABILITY-RESEARCH <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> >
Sent: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 2:11 pm
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing

Unfortunately, authors have little say over the price a particular publisher sets for their books. If they did, most would make them very reasonable so more people could access them.



According to the author, it appears that Cambridge University Press will be making some attempt at increasing accessibility for VIP via Adobe eBook. It seems that rather than castigating the author, it may make more sense to target publishers.



Kim Steele



-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
From: Karen Nakamura < <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]>
Date: Wed, December 06, 2017 1:44 pm
To:  <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]

I’m not being defensive. I’m neither the author nor the publisher. I just wanted to point out that at least in the USA, books through book share are free for what they call  print impaired users. I know it doesn’t help non-USA people.



You might want to encourage your own national governments to either fund or set up their own system like Bookshare where books in accessible formats are free to blind/VI/print impaired users. It’s not perfect but you also can’t complain about free books.



I’m actually worried as the USA federal government may defund Bookshare along with other BVI services.





Karen Nakamura (she/her/hers)

Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and Professor of Anthropology

Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology

University of California Berkeley

 <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]

 <http://disability.jp/nakamura> disability.jp/nakamura


  _____


From: Pamela < <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]>
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:27:01 PM
To: Karen Nakamura
Cc:  <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing



Your defensive statements do not hold water. The book should be accessible. Accessibility does not mean disable people must make extrea effort

the non-disabled people do not have to make. Your service is discriminatory, no matter who accepts your behaviour, or where it is enacted.

Dr Pamela Waugh
> On 7 Dec 2017, at 8:20 am, Karen Nakamura < <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> At least in the USA, this title and many others are available through BookShare, which an initiative of the US Department of Education and operated by Benetech. It makes many books including academic titles, available for print-impaired persons (which includes not just blind and visually impaired, but folks who are dyslexic, those who can’t read because of other processing disabilities, physical disabilities, migraines, etc.).
>
>  <https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287> https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287
>
> I know this is a UK mailing list and that you’re in Australia, so it doesn’t help; but if there are list members in the USA, I thought you’d want to know.
>
> Still doesn’t excuse the high price of the book.
>
> Karen
>
>
>> On Dec 6, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Pamela < <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> This book is of particular interest to me, as a visionimpaired author, but Iwill not be reading or buying it.
>>
>> I will not read it because it is advertised only in hard copy, and i will not scan it. It should be available
>>
>> in an electronic format. Secondly, I will not buy it because it is advertised at the price of AUD 155.
>>
>> The presentation of your book makes me wonder if you have any experience either as an author or as a vision-impaired persom (VIP).
>>
>> You must/should know the a minute percentage of VIPs are blind or sightless. Sightlessness is most people's
>>
>> assumption of blindness, so behave as if their assumption is correct. If you have researched disabled people's history, you must know that
>>
>> their stance is 'Nothing about us without us.'
>>
>> I hope the marketing of your book markedly improves.
>>
>> Dr Pamela Waugh
>>
>> Canberra Australia
>>
>>
>>> On 7 Dec 2017, at 2:12 am, Heather Tilley < <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>
>>> Dear Colleagues,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I'm pleased to send notice of my book ‘Blindness and Writing: From Wordsworth to Gissing' which has just been published in hardback by Cambridge University Press (ISBN 9781107194212).
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> In the book I examine the huge shifts that took place in the experience and conceptualisation of blindness during the nineteenth century. Considering the ways in which visually-impaired people used texts to shape their own identities, I argue that blindness was also a means by which writers reflected on crafting literary form. The book:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> o     - Offers revisionary readings of nineteenth-century canonical authors
>>>
>>> o     - Extends understandings of disabled and embodied identity
>>>
>>> o     - Presents a range of under-researched archival material relating to the history of disability
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> For more information please visit  <http://www.cambridge.org/9781107194212> www.cambridge.org/9781107194212
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> The book will also be made available in accessible format to all the institutions who participate in the RNIB's Bookshare programme. Cambridge University Press are also working on having a special version of the Adobe eBook produced with a ‘read out loud’ feature which will be made available for sale on their website when ready.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Many thanks
>>>
>>> Heather
>>>
>>> (Please note I am on maternity leave until the end of May 2018 so it may take me a little while to respond to any queries).
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Dr Heather Tilley
>>> Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow
>>> Department of English and Humanities
>>> Birkbeck, University of London
>>> 43 Gordon Square
>>> London WC1H 0PD
>>>
>>> Email:  <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]
>>> Staff profile:  <http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley> http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley
>>> Projects:  <http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/> http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/
>>>                 <https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/> https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ________________End of message________________
>>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds ( <http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies> www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>>>
>>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to  <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]
>>>
>>> Archives and tools are located at:  <http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html> www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>>>
>>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>>
>>
>> ________________End of message________________
>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds ( <http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies> www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>>
>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to  <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]
>>
>> Archives and tools are located at:  <http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html> www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>>
>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>
>

________________End of message________________

This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds ( <http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies> www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).

Enquiries about list administration should be sent to  <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]

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You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.

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Enquiries about list administration should be sent to  <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]

Archives and tools are located at:  <http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html> www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html

You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.



*******************

“The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”   Mark Twain
 *****************

Beth Omansky, Ph.D.

Portland, OR

USA

[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>







-----Original Message-----
From: Kim Steele <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> >
To: DISABILITY-RESEARCH <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> >
Sent: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 2:11 pm
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing

Unfortunately, authors have little say over the price a particular publisher sets for their books. If they did, most would make them very reasonable so more people could access them.



According to the author, it appears that Cambridge University Press will be making some attempt at increasing accessibility for VIP via Adobe eBook. It seems that rather than castigating the author, it may make more sense to target publishers.



Kim Steele



-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
From: Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> >
Date: Wed, December 06, 2017 1:44 pm
To: [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>

I’m not being defensive. I’m neither the author nor the publisher. I just wanted to point out that at least in the USA, books through book share are free for what they call  print impaired users. I know it doesn’t help non-USA people.



You might want to encourage your own national governments to either fund or set up their own system like Bookshare where books in accessible formats are free to blind/VI/print impaired users. It’s not perfect but you also can’t complain about free books.



I’m actually worried as the USA federal government may defund Bookshare along with other BVI services.





Karen Nakamura (she/her/hers)

Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and Professor of Anthropology

Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology

University of California Berkeley

[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>

disability.jp/nakamura <http://disability.jp/nakamura>


  _____


From: Pamela <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> >
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:27:01 PM
To: Karen Nakamura
Cc: [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing



Your defensive statements do not hold water. The book should be accessible. Accessibility does not mean disable people must make extrea effort

the non-disabled people do not have to make. Your service is discriminatory, no matter who accepts your behaviour, or where it is enacted.

Dr Pamela Waugh
> On 7 Dec 2017, at 8:20 am, Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> > wrote:
>
> At least in the USA, this title and many others are available through BookShare, which an initiative of the US Department of Education and operated by Benetech. It makes many books including academic titles, available for print-impaired persons (which includes not just blind and visually impaired, but folks who are dyslexic, those who can’t read because of other processing disabilities, physical disabilities, migraines, etc.).
>
> https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287
>
> I know this is a UK mailing list and that you’re in Australia, so it doesn’t help; but if there are list members in the USA, I thought you’d want to know.
>
> Still doesn’t excuse the high price of the book.
>
> Karen
>
>
>> On Dec 6, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Pamela <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> > wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> This book is of particular interest to me, as a visionimpaired author, but Iwill not be reading or buying it.
>>
>> I will not read it because it is advertised only in hard copy, and i will not scan it. It should be available
>>
>> in an electronic format. Secondly, I will not buy it because it is advertised at the price of AUD 155.
>>
>> The presentation of your book makes me wonder if you have any experience either as an author or as a vision-impaired persom (VIP).
>>
>> You must/should know the a minute percentage of VIPs are blind or sightless. Sightlessness is most people's
>>
>> assumption of blindness, so behave as if their assumption is correct. If you have researched disabled people's history, you must know that
>>
>> their stance is 'Nothing about us without us.'
>>
>> I hope the marketing of your book markedly improves.
>>
>> Dr Pamela Waugh
>>
>> Canberra Australia
>>
>>
>>> On 7 Dec 2017, at 2:12 am, Heather Tilley <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> > wrote:
>>>
>>> Dear Colleagues,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I'm pleased to send notice of my book ‘Blindness and Writing: From Wordsworth to Gissing' which has just been published in hardback by Cambridge University Press (ISBN 9781107194212).
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> In the book I examine the huge shifts that took place in the experience and conceptualisation of blindness during the nineteenth century. Considering the ways in which visually-impaired people used texts to shape their own identities, I argue that blindness was also a means by which writers reflected on crafting literary form. The book:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> o     - Offers revisionary readings of nineteenth-century canonical authors
>>>
>>> o     - Extends understandings of disabled and embodied identity
>>>
>>> o     - Presents a range of under-researched archival material relating to the history of disability
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> For more information please visit www.cambridge.org/9781107194212 <http://www.cambridge.org/9781107194212>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> The book will also be made available in accessible format to all the institutions who participate in the RNIB's Bookshare programme. Cambridge University Press are also working on having a special version of the Adobe eBook produced with a ‘read out loud’ feature which will be made available for sale on their website when ready.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Many thanks
>>>
>>> Heather
>>>
>>> (Please note I am on maternity leave until the end of May 2018 so it may take me a little while to respond to any queries).
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Dr Heather Tilley
>>> Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow
>>> Department of English and Humanities
>>> Birkbeck, University of London
>>> 43 Gordon Square
>>> London WC1H 0PD
>>>
>>> Email: [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>> Staff profile: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley
>>> Projects: http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/
>>>                https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ________________End of message________________
>>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies <http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies> ).
>>>
>>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>>>
>>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html <http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html>
>>>
>>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>>
>>
>> ________________End of message________________
>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies <http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies> ).
>>
>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>
>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html <http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html>
>>
>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>
>

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------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 7 Dec 2017 10:49:03 -0800
From:    Devva Kasnitz <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: GREAT NEWS!!   OR IS IT??? SJDR open access

Woops! I’m clearly moving too fast! I didn't realize that “open access” in this case means the authors pay!



SDS’s own journal, Disability Studies Quarterly, is open access but authors pay nothing. DSQ is funded in part by the Members of SDS with a generous contribution from the OSU Libraries. All SDS pays for is the editing and we don't pay much compared to most journals. Authors need not be SDS Members either.



I have deep respect for the Nordic group, NNDR, but have not had access to their journal. They do say that the NNDR will pick up the fee for authors without funding. It’s not clear if authors whose institutions WON'T pay are covered. Institutions could refuse the cost. While the old system had NNDR Members and subscribers covering the costs of the non-profit publisher, it now shifts to NNDR Members and the author’s institutions.



As an eternal part-time “Adjunct,” I’m curious about the logistics of this. Do I have to jump through extra hoops to have the fee waived? Do authors have to beg their institutions? Where it’s almost impossible to really anonymize authorship for peer review, will subtle bias creep in when funds get really tight? What about accessible platforms? Do they cost more?



Most journals seem to charge $25+ to buy a single article. I keep thinking that at $5 each I would buy many. At $20+ I buy none. I can buy a used edited book for that. What’s a peer-reviewed Journal article worth to an author or their school? Do academic departments pay or is it centralized? This could; penalize small new programs with very productive new faculty, like disability studies. Do these economics enter in hiring, promotion, and grant receipt? We usually think of a peer-reviewed article in the right journal as trumping a book chapter.



Greetings from NNDR to Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research on its transition to an Open Access publication

 <http://nndr.no/board/patrickkermit2/>
Patrick Kermit, president of the NNDR

The Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research is now completing its transition to an open access journal published by Stockholm University Press, thus transferring the cost of publishing from the reader to the author (or the author’s institution). On behalf of the Nordic Network of Disability Research I congratulate the journal, its editors, the publisher, and last but not least, its readers, on this occasion. I also want to express our gratitude to Taylor & Francis Ltd, who have hosted the journal in years past, both for their good work and the commitment they have shown. We are also very happy that all previously published articles in the back catalogue will be available as open access papers with this transition.

This address is mainly focused on the significance of becoming an open access journal. Disability research and disability studies are interdisciplinary fields, and in every respect academic disciplines as scientific as anyone else. The foundation for our work consists in seeking and expanding knowledge in our field, applying methods which observe common standards meant to secure norms like reliability and the possibility of verification. At the same time, one cannot fully appreciate the significance of disability research and disability studies without recognizing that other normative questions concerning social justice, equal rights, access and accessibility permeates studies in this field. This is why our decision to move to open access publishing is significant.

Open access publishing is neither charity nor well intended help to unfortunate people who cannot afford to subscribe to journals. Instead open access publishing is a business model for publishing, and as such, it must be sustainable in competitive economies. Hence, we would not have chosen open access publishing if we did not believe this is the business model for the future. Having said this, open access publishing is also a business model which ensures and promotes social justice, equal rights, access and accessibility in a much better way than traditional publishing models: Once a paper is published, it can be accessed and read by anyone because the publishing cost is transferred to the author, or the author’s institution, whom, by paying a publishing fee ensures access for everyone.

The Nordic Network of Disability Research have decided that the funds we used to pay for our former publisher’s services, will now be used to cover these fees where authors have no funding themselves. It must be noted that Stockholm University Press SUP is a non-profit publisher, so all the money paid by the network is solely used for covering the costs related to the production of the journal and to maintain the professional look and feel of the content.

Again, we do not contribute these means as a form of charity, but as means securing the presentation of quality research in our journal. In other words, we now apply a model ensuring both a larger circle of readers, and an accessible publishing platform for more researchers in the field. Our hope is, that this will be an inspiration in this field, and that it also will improve the standard of the publications and thus bring the Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research to new heights.

Finally, we extend our gratitude to the editors Hanna Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, Janice Mclaughlin and Hisayo Katsui for all the work they have put in so far to make this transition happen. Sofie Wennström at Stockholm University Press has also been of invaluable help to us, and for that we are truly grateful. We wish the editors and Stockholm University Press good luck with their tasks ahead!

Lancaster, November 30, 2017

Patrick Kermit

President of the Nordic Network of Disability Research

This entry was posted in  <http://nndr.no/category/uncategorized/> Uncategorized on  <http://nndr.no/greetings-from-nndr-to-scandinavian-journal-of-disability-research-on-its-transition-to-an-open-access-publication/> December 6, 2017 by  <http://nndr.no/author/nndr-president/> Patrick Kermit.

Devva Kasnitz, PhD

Adj Professor, City University of New York—School of Professional Studies—Disability Studies

Executive Director, Society for Disability Studies, PO BOX 5570, Eureka CA 95502



From: Devva Kasnitz [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Thursday, December 7, 2017 8:23 AM
To: SDS Members ([log in to unmask]) <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: GREAT NEWS!! SJDR open access



Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research transition to open access:





Devva Kasnitz, PhD

Adj Professor, City University of New York—School of Professional Studies—Disability Studies

Executive Director, Society for Disability Studies, PO BOX 5570, Eureka CA 95502



From: The Disability-Research Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Simo Vehmas
Sent: Thursday, December 7, 2017 7:35 AM
To: [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Subject: [DISABILITY-RESEARCH] SJDR open access



Apologies for cross-posting



Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research transition to open access:



http://nndr.no/greetings-from-nndr-to-scandinavian-journal-of-disability-research-on-its-transition-to-an-open-access-publication/



Best, Simo Vehmas

________________End of message________________

This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies <http://www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies> ).

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------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 7 Dec 2017 18:51:25 +0000
From:    Vin <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing

I think people might be confusing

‘visually’ with ‘ visibly’ . . . The first relates to vision but the second means an effect that can be seen

Vin
Sent from my phone

> On 7 Dec 2017, at 17:32, laura welti <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> I try to say vision impaired rather than visually impaired, specifically to avoid that problem.
>
> Laura
>
>> On 7 December 2017 at 03:03, Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> Hiya -
>>
>> At least in the United States, the terminology “blind and visually impaired” is widely used. I’m not blind myself and so I try to use the terminology that communities use. I take my direction from Lighthouse and NFB — but I’m also aware that many people feel that these organizations don’t represent all blind people. In any case, when referring to any single individual, I use the term that that person prefers. What do you prefer we use for you?
>>
>> We should remember that not everyone will agree on language.  I belong to the  mad scholars / psychiatric disability communities and there is absolutely no consensus there on what terminology to use. If you use any term, you’re sure to offend someone.
>>
>>
>> Warmly,
>>
>> Karen
>>
>>
>>
>> > On Dec 6, 2017, at 6:37 PM, Janice Ollerton <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> >
>> > I'm bemused by the term 'visually impaired'. My vision impaired friends often joke that they "don't look so bad as to be described as a visual impairment". Maybe this author needs to amend her terminology.
>> >
>> > Janice
>> >
>> > Sent from my phone
>> >
>> > From: The Disability-Research Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of Beth Omansky <[log in to unmask]>
>> > Sent: Thursday, December 7, 2017 9:47:14 AM
>> > To: [log in to unmask]
>> > Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>> >
>> > I agree with Kim.  We ought to be putting pressure on publishers.  Even when a publisher offers Ebooks, it's not a guarantee the 3rd party platform will be accessible.  As authors, we ought to make sure our publishers will offer Ebook or accessible PDFs before we sign our contracts.
>> >
>> > BTW, Bookshare is not free to everyone in the U.S.  If you're not a student somewhere, it costs $50 per year.
>> >
>> > Beth
>> >
>> > *******************
>> > “The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”   Mark Twain
>> >  *****************
>> > Beth Omansky, Ph.D.
>> > Portland, OR
>> > USA
>> > [log in to unmask]
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > -----Original Message-----
>> > From: Kim Steele <[log in to unmask]>
>> > To: DISABILITY-RESEARCH <[log in to unmask]>
>> > Sent: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 2:11 pm
>> > Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>> >
>> > Unfortunately, authors have little say over the price a particular publisher sets for their books. If they did, most would make them very reasonable so more people could access them.
>> >
>> > According to the author, it appears that Cambridge University Press will be making some attempt at increasing accessibility for VIP via Adobe eBook. It seems that rather than castigating the author, it may make more sense to target publishers.
>> >
>> > Kim Steele
>> >
>> > -------- Original Message --------
>> > Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>> > From: Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]>
>> > Date: Wed, December 06, 2017 1:44 pm
>> > To: [log in to unmask]
>> >
>> > I’m not being defensive. I’m neither the author nor the publisher. I just wanted to point out that at least in the USA, books through book share are free for what they call  print impaired users. I know it doesn’t help non-USA people.
>> >
>> > You might want to encourage your own national governments to either fund or set up their own system like Bookshare where books in accessible formats are free to blind/VI/print impaired users. It’s not perfect but you also can’t complain about free books.
>> >
>> > I’m actually worried as the USA federal government may defund Bookshare along with other BVI services.
>> >
>> >
>> > Karen Nakamura (she/her/hers)
>> > Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and Professor of Anthropology
>> > Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology
>> > University of California Berkeley
>> > [log in to unmask]
>> > disability.jp/nakamura
>> > From: Pamela <[log in to unmask]>
>> > Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:27:01 PM
>> > To: Karen Nakamura
>> > Cc: [log in to unmask]
>> > Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>> >
>> > Your defensive statements do not hold water. The book should be accessible. Accessibility does not mean disable people must make extrea effort
>> >
>> > the non-disabled people do not have to make. Your service is discriminatory, no matter who accepts your behaviour, or where it is enacted.
>> >
>> > Dr Pamela Waugh
>> > > On 7 Dec 2017, at 8:20 am, Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> > >
>> > > At least in the USA, this title and many others are available through BookShare, which an initiative of the US Department of Education and operated by Benetech. It makes many books including academic titles, available for print-impaired persons (which includes not just blind and visually impaired, but folks who are dyslexic, those who can’t read because of other processing disabilities, physical disabilities, migraines, etc.).
>> > >
>> > > https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287
>> > >
>> > > I know this is a UK mailing list and that you’re in Australia, so it doesn’t help; but if there are list members in the USA, I thought you’d want to know.
>> > >
>> > > Still doesn’t excuse the high price of the book.
>> > >
>> > > Karen
>> > >
>> > >
>> > >> On Dec 6, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Pamela <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> > >>
>> > >> Hi,
>> > >>
>> > >> This book is of particular interest to me, as a visionimpaired author, but Iwill not be reading or buying it.
>> > >>
>> > >> I will not read it because it is advertised only in hard copy, and i will not scan it. It should be available
>> > >>
>> > >> in an electronic format. Secondly, I will not buy it because it is advertised at the price of AUD 155.
>> > >>
>> > >> The presentation of your book makes me wonder if you have any experience either as an author or as a vision-impaired persom (VIP).
>> > >>
>> > >> You must/should know the a minute percentage of VIPs are blind or sightless. Sightlessness is most people's
>> > >>
>> > >> assumption of blindness, so behave as if their assumption is correct. If you have researched disabled people's history, you must know that
>> > >>
>> > >> their stance is 'Nothing about us without us.'
>> > >>
>> > >> I hope the marketing of your book markedly improves.
>> > >>
>> > >> Dr Pamela Waugh
>> > >>
>> > >> Canberra Australia
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> > >>> On 7 Dec 2017, at 2:12 am, Heather Tilley <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> > >>>
>> > >>> Dear Colleagues,
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>> I'm pleased to send notice of my book ‘Blindness and Writing: From Wordsworth to Gissing' which has just been published in hardback by Cambridge University Press (ISBN 9781107194212).
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>> In the book I examine the huge shifts that took place in the experience and conceptualisation of blindness during the nineteenth century. Considering the ways in which visually-impaired people used texts to shape their own identities, I argue that blindness was also a means by which writers reflected on crafting literary form. The book:
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>> o     - Offers revisionary readings of nineteenth-century canonical authors
>> > >>>
>> > >>> o     - Extends understandings of disabled and embodied identity
>> > >>>
>> > >>> o     - Presents a range of under-researched archival material relating to the history of disability
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>> For more information please visit www.cambridge.org/9781107194212
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>> The book will also be made available in accessible format to all the institutions who participate in the RNIB's Bookshare programme. Cambridge University Press are also working on having a special version of the Adobe eBook produced with a ‘read out loud’ feature which will be made available for sale on their website when ready.
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>> Many thanks
>> > >>>
>> > >>> Heather
>> > >>>
>> > >>> (Please note I am on maternity leave until the end of May 2018 so it may take me a little while to respond to any queries).
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>> --
>> > >>> Dr Heather Tilley
>> > >>> Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow
>> > >>> Department of English and Humanities
>> > >>> Birkbeck, University of London
>> > >>> 43 Gordon Square
>> > >>> London WC1H 0PD
>> > >>>
>> > >>> Email: [log in to unmask]
>> > >>> Staff profile: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley
>> > >>> Projects: http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/
>> > >>>                https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>> ________________End of message________________
>> > >>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> > >>>
>> > >>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>> > >>>
>> > >>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>> > >>>
>> > >>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>> > >>>
>> > >>
>> > >> ________________End of message________________
>> > >> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> > >>
>> > >> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>> > >>
>> > >> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>> > >>
>> > >> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>> > >>
>> > >
>> >
>> > ________________End of message________________
>> > This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> > Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>> > Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>> > You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>> > ________________End of message________________
>> > This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> > Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>> > Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>> > You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>> >
>> > *******************
>> > “The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”   Mark Twain
>> >  *****************
>> > Beth Omansky, Ph.D.
>> > Portland, OR
>> > USA
>> > [log in to unmask]
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > -----Original Message-----
>> > From: Kim Steele <[log in to unmask]>
>> > To: DISABILITY-RESEARCH <[log in to unmask]>
>> > Sent: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 2:11 pm
>> > Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>> >
>> > Unfortunately, authors have little say over the price a particular publisher sets for their books. If they did, most would make them very reasonable so more people could access them.
>> >
>> > According to the author, it appears that Cambridge University Press will be making some attempt at increasing accessibility for VIP via Adobe eBook. It seems that rather than castigating the author, it may make more sense to target publishers.
>> >
>> > Kim Steele
>> >
>> > -------- Original Message --------
>> > Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>> > From: Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]>
>> > Date: Wed, December 06, 2017 1:44 pm
>> > To: [log in to unmask]
>> >
>> > I’m not being defensive. I’m neither the author nor the publisher. I just wanted to point out that at least in the USA, books through book share are free for what they call  print impaired users. I know it doesn’t help non-USA people.
>> >
>> > You might want to encourage your own national governments to either fund or set up their own system like Bookshare where books in accessible formats are free to blind/VI/print impaired users. It’s not perfect but you also can’t complain about free books.
>> >
>> > I’m actually worried as the USA federal government may defund Bookshare along with other BVI services.
>> >
>> >
>> > Karen Nakamura (she/her/hers)
>> > Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and Professor of Anthropology
>> > Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology
>> > University of California Berkeley
>> > [log in to unmask]
>> > disability.jp/nakamura
>> > From: Pamela <[log in to unmask]>
>> > Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:27:01 PM
>> > To: Karen Nakamura
>> > Cc: [log in to unmask]
>> > Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
>> >
>> > Your defensive statements do not hold water. The book should be accessible. Accessibility does not mean disable people must make extrea effort
>> >
>> > the non-disabled people do not have to make. Your service is discriminatory, no matter who accepts your behaviour, or where it is enacted.
>> >
>> > Dr Pamela Waugh
>> > > On 7 Dec 2017, at 8:20 am, Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> > >
>> > > At least in the USA, this title and many others are available through BookShare, which an initiative of the US Department of Education and operated by Benetech. It makes many books including academic titles, available for print-impaired persons (which includes not just blind and visually impaired, but folks who are dyslexic, those who can’t read because of other processing disabilities, physical disabilities, migraines, etc.).
>> > >
>> > > https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287
>> > >
>> > > I know this is a UK mailing list and that you’re in Australia, so it doesn’t help; but if there are list members in the USA, I thought you’d want to know.
>> > >
>> > > Still doesn’t excuse the high price of the book.
>> > >
>> > > Karen
>> > >
>> > >
>> > >> On Dec 6, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Pamela <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> > >>
>> > >> Hi,
>> > >>
>> > >> This book is of particular interest to me, as a visionimpaired author, but Iwill not be reading or buying it.
>> > >>
>> > >> I will not read it because it is advertised only in hard copy, and i will not scan it. It should be available
>> > >>
>> > >> in an electronic format. Secondly, I will not buy it because it is advertised at the price of AUD 155.
>> > >>
>> > >> The presentation of your book makes me wonder if you have any experience either as an author or as a vision-impaired persom (VIP).
>> > >>
>> > >> You must/should know the a minute percentage of VIPs are blind or sightless. Sightlessness is most people's
>> > >>
>> > >> assumption of blindness, so behave as if their assumption is correct. If you have researched disabled people's history, you must know that
>> > >>
>> > >> their stance is 'Nothing about us without us.'
>> > >>
>> > >> I hope the marketing of your book markedly improves.
>> > >>
>> > >> Dr Pamela Waugh
>> > >>
>> > >> Canberra Australia
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> > >>> On 7 Dec 2017, at 2:12 am, Heather Tilley <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> > >>>
>> > >>> Dear Colleagues,
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>> I'm pleased to send notice of my book ‘Blindness and Writing: From Wordsworth to Gissing' which has just been published in hardback by Cambridge University Press (ISBN 9781107194212).
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>> In the book I examine the huge shifts that took place in the experience and conceptualisation of blindness during the nineteenth century. Considering the ways in which visually-impaired people used texts to shape their own identities, I argue that blindness was also a means by which writers reflected on crafting literary form. The book:
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>> o     - Offers revisionary readings of nineteenth-century canonical authors
>> > >>>
>> > >>> o     - Extends understandings of disabled and embodied identity
>> > >>>
>> > >>> o     - Presents a range of under-researched archival material relating to the history of disability
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>> For more information please visit www.cambridge.org/9781107194212
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>> The book will also be made available in accessible format to all the institutions who participate in the RNIB's Bookshare programme. Cambridge University Press are also working on having a special version of the Adobe eBook produced with a ‘read out loud’ feature which will be made available for sale on their website when ready.
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>> Many thanks
>> > >>>
>> > >>> Heather
>> > >>>
>> > >>> (Please note I am on maternity leave until the end of May 2018 so it may take me a little while to respond to any queries).
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>> --
>> > >>> Dr Heather Tilley
>> > >>> Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow
>> > >>> Department of English and Humanities
>> > >>> Birkbeck, University of London
>> > >>> 43 Gordon Square
>> > >>> London WC1H 0PD
>> > >>>
>> > >>> Email: [log in to unmask]
>> > >>> Staff profile: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley
>> > >>> Projects: http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/
>> > >>>                https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>>
>> > >>> ________________End of message________________
>> > >>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> > >>>
>> > >>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>> > >>>
>> > >>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>> > >>>
>> > >>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>> > >>>
>> > >>
>> > >> ________________End of message________________
>> > >> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> > >>
>> > >> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>> > >>
>> > >> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>> > >>
>> > >> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>> > >>
>> > >
>> >
>> > ________________End of message________________
>> > This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> > Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>> > Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>> > You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>> > ________________End of message________________
>> > This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> > Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>> > Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>> > You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>> > ________________End of message________________
>> > This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>> >
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End of DISABILITY-RESEARCH Digest - 6 Dec 2017 to 7 Dec 2017 - Special issue (#2017-233)
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This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).

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