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UTSG  December 2018

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Subject:

Call for contributions Special Issue “Geographies of bike-sharing and emerging forms of shared micro-mobility” *Apologies for any cross-posting*

From:

"Anaya Boig, Esther" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Anaya Boig, Esther

Date:

Wed, 5 Dec 2018 19:45:52 +0000

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text/plain

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Dear Colleagues, 
 
 
Call for contributions: proposed Journal of Transport Geography Special Issue “Geographies of bike-sharing and emerging forms of shared micro-mobility” 
 
 
While bike-share schemes and emerging micro-mobility options may make claims to be socially inclusive by supporting modal shift and providing alternatives for those marginalised by private car based mobility, the reality is often different. Any aspiration for inclusive bike-sharing and shared micro-mobilities is fundamentally related to the use of space and, this being the case, these shared mobility services need to be considered in terms of how they manifest or undermine established power relations. 
 
 
You are invited to submit an abstract for a proposal of a Special Issue of the Journal of Transport Geography<https://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-transport-geography>. The proposal is coordinated by the co-chairs of Sessions 56<http://conference.rgs.org/AC2018/56>, 324<http://conference.rgs.org/AC2018/324>, 353<http://conference.rgs.org/AC2018/353> of the Royal Geographical Society Annual Conference, but we warmly welcome submissions from further contributors. 
 
 
More information about the Special Issue proposal process and provisional deadlines can be found here<https://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-transport-geography/news/guidelines-for-special-issues-journal-of-transport-geography>. 
 
 
You can find the Call for Abstracts below. 
 
 
Important dates: 
 
  *   Deadline for submission of abstracts: Friday 11th January 17:00 anywhere in the world. 
 
  *   Expected submission of the Special Issue proposal and acceptance of abstracts: before the end of January 2019. 
 
 
We will confirm our acceptance of your abstract and, once the proposal is accepted we will confirm dates for submission of full papers, but we expect that this will be July 2019, with the full special issue published April-June 2020. However, papers that are accepted before this date will be available ‘online first’ as soon as possible. 
 
 
We would be delighted if you would confirm interest, along with a commitment to submitting an abstract by the closing date. Please, also, feel free to distribute the call to targeted researchers, working with critical approaches to bike-sharing and/or micro-mobility. We are really excited about this proposal and we encourage you to join us in this adventure. 
 
 
For any questions about the proposal, to confirm interest or to submit an abstract, please email: 
 
  *   Esther Anaya [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]> 
 
  *   Julie Clark [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]> 
 
  *   Angela Curl [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]> 
 
Best regards, 
 
Esther Anaya 
Research Postgraduate 
Centre for Environmental Policy 
Imperial College London 
Email: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]> 
Website: www.imperial.ac.uk/people/e.anaya14<http://www.imperial.ac.uk/people/e.anaya14> 
----------------- 
 
Call for contributions: proposed Journal of Transport Geography Special Issue “Geographies of bike-sharing and emerging forms of shared micro-mobility” 
 
The global landscape of urban transport is changing rapidly and at an accelerating rate, to the point that “disruption is the new normal”. Within this context, public bike-sharing schemes are increasingly part of a dynamic urban transport landscape. More recently, forms of what has been called “micro-mobility” are emerging, broadening the shared mobility offering in cities to include electric scooters, hoverboards, and segways, amongst others. The benefits of cycling have been widely documented and evidenced; however, more knowledge is needed in order to assess whether these benefits are within the reach of all population subgroups, when it comes to considering these and other shared systems. While bike-share schemes and emerging micro-mobility options may make claims to be socially inclusive by supporting modal shift and providing alternatives for those marginalised by private car based mobility, the reality is often different: users of public bike-sharing schemes, like cyclists in general, tend to have higher incomes, high levels of formal education, and be disproportionately white, middle aged and male. 
 
Inequality issues are crucial in planning a transition towards a more sustainable and just mobility future. There is an inherently spatial dimension in access to these emerging forms of transport, in both the distribution of provision and the socio-demographic profile of users. Any aspiration for inclusive bike-sharing and shared micro-mobilities is fundamentally related to the use of space and, this being the case, these shared mobility services need to be considered in terms of how they manifest or undermine established power relations. Particularly in the United States, newly implemented bicycle paths and bike-share schemes have been critiqued on the grounds of equity and contributing to gentrification processes, where only an advantaged part of society receives the benefits of transport policy and investment. Similarly, shared mobility schemes have generated a “bikelash”, resistance and hostility towards the presence of cyclists or cycling facilities in the streets. Nevertheless, there is still relatively little research into how bike-share and other emerging forms of shared micro-mobility are impacting upon spatial justice in different contexts. 
 
We aim at introducing critical approaches to these mobility schemes, namely bike-sharing and shared micro-mobility. We would like to encourage a geographical view in which the use and abuse of space is the key to understand and unveil the existing power relations, impacts and conflicts amongst all kinds of actors involved. 
 
We welcome critical papers exploring accessibility and equity issues for bike-sharing and other forms of shared micro-mobility, including, but not limited to: 
 
 
●      Allocation, use and appropriation of urban public space to bike sharing and micro-mobility 
 
●      Evaluation of the access and use of bike-share and micro-mobility (including dockless schemes) among those likely to be excluded or with additional mobility needs, such as older people, migrants and refugees, women, disabled people, lower income groups, LGBTIQ people, and minority ethnic groups. 
 
●      Governance and inclusiveness of new mobility services such as dockless/floating bike-share schemes and electric scooters, 
 
●      Approaches to inclusive urban transport policies relating to bike-sharing and shared micro-mobility 
 
●      Empirical or conceptual papers on socio-spatial inequalities, justice, power relations and inclusivity of bike-sharing and micro-mobilities. 
 
Keywords: cycling, bike-sharing, micro-mobility, equity, inclusive mobilities, mobility justice; spatial justice 
 
ABSTRACT LENGTH: between 200 and 250 words. Please enclose author information (full name, email and affiliation) 
DEADLINE: Friday 11 January 2019. 
---------------------------------------------- 
 
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