JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for STADTKOLLOQUIUM Archives


STADTKOLLOQUIUM Archives

STADTKOLLOQUIUM Archives


STADTKOLLOQUIUM@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

STADTKOLLOQUIUM Home

STADTKOLLOQUIUM Home

STADTKOLLOQUIUM  April 2018

STADTKOLLOQUIUM April 2018

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Call for papers Tower block failure: high-rise anthropology ASA 2018

From:

Saffron Woodcraft <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Saffron Woodcraft <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 12 Apr 2018 13:47:44 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (13 lines)

Dear Stadtkolloquium colleagues,

We invite abstracts for papers that ethnographically explore the shifting terrain of the tower block for a panel at the ASA 2018 Conference at the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography, University of Oxford, September 18-21, 2018.  Please submit an abstract by 20 April to https://nomadit.co.uk/asa/asa2018/conferencesuite.php/panels/6773

Many thanks, Constance Smith (University of Manchester) and Saffron Woodcraft (UCL)

Tower block failures: high-rise anthropology

In the wake of the Grenfell Tower disaster in London and recent devastating tower block collapses in cities such as Nairobi, Mumbai, and Rio de Janeiro, failed buildings have exposed the injustices of austerity politics, the volatility of construction materials, and disregard for regulations and planning. These catastrophic failures have also reanimated debates about 'proper' forms of urban living, the political economy of the city and the widening inequalities and insecurities that seem to characterise contemporary urban life.

Yet, tower blocks have also been symbols of modernity, status and aspiration. From UK post-war promises of an inclusive future in the 'cities in the sky' to the edifice complex of skyscraper cities such as New York and Hong Kong, the tower block has been a place of dreams as well as nightmares. Even when they fail, tower blocks continue to shape the sociality, politics and materiality of our cities in important ways, influencing the design of future communities, economies of investment and development, and forms of political activism.

We invite papers that ethnographically explore this shifting terrain of the tower block. Whether as contested symbol, site of collapse or shattered home, tower block failure exposes the precarity of urban life whilst also acting as a catalyst for its transformation.

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
August 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
June 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
May 2011
April 2011


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager