JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for FORCED-MIGRATION Archives


FORCED-MIGRATION Archives

FORCED-MIGRATION Archives


FORCED-MIGRATION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

FORCED-MIGRATION Home

FORCED-MIGRATION Home

FORCED-MIGRATION  January 2011

FORCED-MIGRATION January 2011

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Call for papers Disasters - Mobility - Communications: Exploring the Links

From:

Forced Migration List <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Forced Migration List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 11 Jan 2011 11:13:53 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (187 lines)

Dear colleagues,

Please find below the call for papers for a workshop on ‘Disasters – 
Mobility – Communications: Exploring the Links’ to be held 16-17 May, 
2011 in Bielefeld. The workshop is being organised as an activity of the 
research group 'Communicating Disaster' at the Center for 
Interdisciplinary Research (ZiF) in Bielefeld, Germany 
http://www.uni-bielefeld.de/(en)/ZIF/FG/2010CommunicatingDisaster/.

Abstracts of up to 300-400 words should be submitted by 31st January 
2011. Apologies for this short notice.

Please circulate this notice as appropriate. For further information 
please contact Katharina Inhetveen [log in to unmask]

Please send all replies to: [log in to unmask]

Oliver Bakewell (Oxford) [log in to unmask]
Katharina Inhetveen (München) [log in to unmask]
Andreas Pott (Osnabrück)  [log in to unmask]

------
------

Call for Papers ‘Disasters – Mobility – Communications: Exploring the 
Links’ Workshop at the Center for Interdisciplinary Research 
Bielefeld/Germany, 16-17 May, 2011

Oliver Bakewell (Oxford), Katharina Inhetveen (München), Andreas Pott 
(Osnabrück)

Disasters are almost invariably associated with an increase in mobility. 
On the one hand, those living in the area directly affected by the 
disaster are confronted with decisions about whether to stay or to leave 
the disaster site; and if they go, they have to decide when, where and 
with whom to go, how long to stay away, and how to keep contact and stay 
informed about the changing conditions at their home. These necessary 
decisions are far more complex than the seemingly self-evident, often 
taken-for-granted urge to run away from disaster.

On the other hand, disasters usually stimulate socio-political responses 
from the humanitarian regime which entails movement towards the disaster 
site. A wide range of actors including government departments, aid 
agencies (including national and international NGOs and UN agencies), 
donors and media organizations face decisions about how far they should 
immerse themselves in the disaster.

Should they decide to do so, their responses regularly include goals and 
strategies concerned with the mobility of the disaster ‘victims’: the 
affected population is to be evacuated, to be made to leave, to be made 
to stay; people are to be channelled to certain sites, to be kept away 
from others, to be hosted and controlled in shelters, to be relocated 
temporarily or permanently, avoiding or gradually leading to migration 
processes.

It is clear then that disasters almost inevitably entail making mobility 
decisions. However, these decisions not only deal with enabling 
movement: efforts to manage disaster-related mobility typically involve 
processes of immobilization as well. Where mobility occurred in largely 
unproblematic, unreflected ways before a disaster, it may be addressed 
as a problem, controlled, and regulated afterwards. Mobilization and 
immobilization in the wake of disasters can be considered as two aspects 
of the socio-political processes of organizing and ordering mobility.

These processes of decision making about mobility rest on the exchange 
of information between different actors and across space. Those directly 
affected by the disaster need rapidly to activate their local, national 
and transnational networks in order to identify their options for moving 
and to mobilize the necessary resources. Information about their 
mobility – how many go and where they move to – is an essential 
ingredient for the decision making of humanitarian actors responding to 
the disaster. Moreover, part of their response is likely to involve 
developing communication strategies to control mobility – to persuade 
people to leave or go to particular places.

In the light of these observations, this workshop aims to explore the 
relationship between the flow of information and the flows of people 
during disasters. To date, such issues have largely been dealt with by 
practitioners, but we are especially interested in perspectives from 
various academic disciplines. We invite the submission of papers or 
ideas for common discussion addressing empirical and theoretical 
questions –for example:

  * How do those affected by disaster make decisions about mobility, and 
in what ways are decisions negotiated or made for them by disaster 
response agencies or political bodies?

  * Are there typical process-related trajectories of decision making, 
including revisions and modifications of mobility decisions? Which 
significant contexts and constraints can be identified by following up 
these trajectories of mobility and/or migration decisions in a 
processual perspective?

  * How do communications between disaster response agencies on the one 
hand and those directly affected on the other hand influence observable 
practices of mobility in the wake of disaster?

  * What are the assumptions and constructions – such as mappings, 
interpretations of help and disaster, perceptions of mobility and 
sedentary belonging – that are underlying organizational plans and 
institutionalized practices of mobilization and immobilization, 
including evacuation, sheltering, channelling flight routes, or 
organized return?

  * Which actual mobility routes and practices occur from the interplay 
between the interpretations of those who are directly affected, the 
interpretations of the agencies of disaster response, and the 
interpretations conveyed by the media? Which effects arise from the 
differences in power and resources that exist between the disaster 
response and humanitarian aid regimes versus those affected by disaster?

The workshop will take place in the context of the research group 
Communicating Disaster at the Center for Interdisciplinary Research 
(ZiF) in Bielefeld, Germany. The research group, which is working over 
the course of one academic year, focuses on the dynamic and discursive 
quality of disasters by bringing together several disciplinary 
approaches. For further information on the research group see:

http://www.uni-bielefeld.de/(en)/ZIF/FG/2010CommunicatingDisaster/

The organizers of the workshop ‘Disasters – Mobility – Communications: 
Exploring the Links’ ask for the submission of abstracts (300 to 400 
words) until 31 January, 2011. Please send your abstract to the 
convenors at the following email addresses (simultaneously):

Oliver Bakewell: [log in to unmask]

Katharina Inhetveen: [log in to unmask]

Andreas Pott: [log in to unmask]

-- 
Prof. Dr. Katharina Inhetveen
Institut für Soziologie
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Konradstr. 6
D-80801 München
Tel.: ++49-(0)89-2180-6315 (Sekretariat -2951)
Email: [log in to unmask]

__________

Dr Oliver Bakewell
Senior Research Officer and James Martin Fellow
[log in to unmask]

http://www.imi.ox.ac.uk/
International Migration Institute
Department of International Development
Queen Elizabeth House
University of Oxford
3 Mansfield Road
Oxford
OX1 3TB
UK

Phone +44 (0) 1865 271902
Fax +44 (0) 1865 2818001

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Prof. Dr. Andreas Pott
Institut für Geographie /
IMIS, Direktor
Universität Osnabrück
49069 Osnabrück
Tel.:     0541-969-4890 (Sekr.: -4267)
Fax:     0541-969-4333
E-Mail: [log in to unmask]

-- 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Note: The material contained in this communication comes to you from the 
Forced Migration Discussion List which is moderated by Forced Migration 
Online, Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Oxford Department of International 
Development, University of Oxford. It does not necessarily reflect the 
views of the RSC or the University. If you re-print, copy, archive or 
re-post this message please retain this disclaimer. Quotations or 
extracts should include attribution to the original sources.

E-mail: [log in to unmask]
Posting guidelines: http://www.forcedmigration.org/discussion/guidelines
Subscribe/unsubscribe: http://tinyurl.com/fmlist-join-leave
List Archives: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/forced-migration.html
RSS: https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?RSS&L=forced-migration
Twitter: http://twitter.com/forcedmigration

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

July 2020
June 2020
May 2020
April 2020
March 2020
February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999
1998


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

For help and support help@jisc.ac.uk

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager