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FORCED-MIGRATION  March 2019

FORCED-MIGRATION March 2019

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Subject:

New publications: LGBTI asylum seekers and refugees; Immigration detention in Slovenia; Refugee camps and refugee rights; Reintegration in Burundi

From:

Forced Migration List <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Forced Migration List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 12 Mar 2019 15:06:08 +0000

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I am pleased to announce the publishing of the edited book "LGBTI Asylum Seekers and Refugees from a Legal and Political Perspective: Persecution, asylum and integration". The book may be found in the link: https://www.springer.com/la/book/9783319919041
Dr. Arzu Güler

Immigration Detention in Slovenia: Where Detention is Called a “Limitation of Movement.”
As a key transit country for refugees and migrants travelling the “Balkan Route,” Slovenia witnessed a significant increase in the number of border crossings during the “refugee crisis.” Citing fears of a “humanitarian catastrophe,” the country tightened immigration controls, erected wire fencing along its border with Croatia, and introduced stringent new asylum legislation. Non-citizens have a mere three days to appeal their detention and they are obliged to pay the costs of their detention. Also, unaccompanied children and families are regularly placed in the country’s sole immigration detention centre and non-custodial alternatives to detention are rarely applied because few non-citizens are able to afford it. Read the full report: https://www.globaldetentionproject.org/countries/europe/slovenia 

New article: 'Refugee camps and refugee rights: A simulation of the response to large refugee influxes’ 
This article introduces and analyzes a one-class role-play simulation during which students engage in stakeholder negotiations on how to respond to a large flow of refugees between two fictional African countries. Participants acquire an in-depth knowledge of arguments regarding granting and restricting refugees’ freedom of movement and civil and economic rights. Contributing to the expanding literature on active and interdisciplinary teaching strategies, this content-oriented simulation teaches public policy, as well as humanitarian and development responses in the wake of a large influx of forced migrants in a developing country. The simulation thus addresses questions related to courses on development, conflict and refugee studies, international organizations, human rights, and international relations. Based on six iterations of the simulation, the essay discusses specific design decisions in the preparation, interaction, and debriefing stage and their impact on the simulation, as well as principal learning outcomes. This includes detailed discussions of briefing memos, role sheets, role selection, and key questions during the debriefing session. The online annex contains the full role-play simulation that can used to replicate the simulation.
       Naujoks. Daniel. 2019. “Refugee Camps and Refugee Rights: A simulation of the response to large refugee influxes.” Journal of Political Science Education. DOI: 10.1080/15512169.2018.1559066, https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15512169.2018.1559066

New IRRI report highlights the difficulties of reintegration in Burundi
Based on interviews with returnees in Burundi, the report, entitled “’They don’t even understand why we fled’: the difficult path to reintegration in Burundi”, describes the daily struggle of recently returned refugees from Tanzania to provide for their families. Most rely on the help of neighbours or local authorities, but this solidarity will be further strained as larger numbers are likely to return ahead of the upcoming electoral process.
http://refugee-rights.org/they-dont-even-understand-why-we-fled-new-irri-report-highlights-the-difficulties-of-reintegration-in-burundi/ 


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Note: The material contained in this communication comes to you from the Forced Migration Discussion List which is moderated by the Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford. It does not necessarily reflect the views of the RSC or the University. If you re-print, copy, archive or re-post this message please retain this disclaimer. Quotations or extracts should include attribution to the original sources.

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