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Subject:

Fw: Summary: Theoretically Oriented "Writing Up"

From:

Sarah Delaney <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Culture-Health-Ireland <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 30 Nov 2005 10:24:26 -0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

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text/plain (140 lines)

for all qualitative teachers and researchers - a goldmine below:

SD
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Edmund Chattoe" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Tuesday, November 29, 2005 1:38 AM
Subject: Summary: Theoretically Oriented "Writing Up"


> Dear All,
> 
> Sorry this took so long. A summary of all the responses I received on 
> writing up and developing theory in quals. Thanks to all those who 
> contributed (listed at bottom).
> 
> ATB,
> 
> Edmund
> 
> 
> Writing Up Qualitative Research, Harry F. Wolcott, 2001, Sage, 
> Chapter 4: Making the Link to Theory.
> 
> Using Narrative in Social Research: Qualitative and Quantitative 
> Approaches, Jane Elliott, 2005, Sage, Chapter: The Researcher as 
> Narrator with accompanying exercise.
> 
> We had publications workshops for interested PhD students but lead by 
> the Research Tutor, with the aim of converting presentations or 
> chapters in to publishable papers. Groups of 4-5 read and commented 
> on a draft circulated by email before the meetings. Our European 
> Institute had a better more developed version (contact 
> [log in to unmask] Abigail Innes) where students were expected to bring 
> problems (and only problems) which I understand was very successful.
> 
> The benefit of these methods is that you have professional input but 
> that students can learn from each other and each others' solutions to 
> problems
> 
> 1. Writing: Howard S. Becker used to run a seminar on writing for his 
> graduate students at Northwestern, which was run informally. Much of 
> our time was spent commenting on each other's work under the guidance 
> of Howie. It taught us to be critical but also compassionate. This 
> eventually emerged as "Writing for Social Scientists: How to Start 
> and Finish Your Thesis, Book, or Article" (University of Chicago 
> Press pb, 1986). This is one of the best books around on writing. Its 
> main benefit is how it deals with the problem of fear in writing, 
> looking foolish.
> 
> 2. Theorising: I recommend Howard's paper, "Theory: The Necessary 
> Evil", available for download at 
> http://home.earthlink.net/~hsbecker/theory.html, which is his web 
> site.
> 
> Descriptions of teaching materials that are being prepared at Qualidata
> 13 Sept 2005
> 
> ESDS Qualidata is developing materials suitable for teaching, 
> especially the teaching of secondary analysis of qualitative research 
> methods. A number of instructors, novice and experienced, have been 
> consulted for their advice. Requests focused on teaching materials 
> that highlight diversity of data types (as instructors often have 
> ready access only to their own data) as well as materials that could 
> support teaching of "beyond the basics" analytical methods. The 
> following materials are in use or under development and more feedback 
> and suggestions are welcomed.
> 
> 1. Interviewing strategies (in process)
> 
> Qualidata materials can be especially helpful in situations where 
> it's necessary to show a wide range of interview types and styles. 
> The first teaching pack will be a diverse set of interviews, with 
> different styles (structured, semi-structured, unstructured; 
> different interviewer styles; and so on). Commentary will be included 
> pointing out strengths and weaknesses of different forms of 
> interviewing. Some of the collections that might be used include:
> SN 4581 -Gender Difference, Anxiety and the Fear of Crime, 1995, W. 
> Hollway and T. Jefferson , in-depth, unstructured interviews
> SN 4841 -Neighbourhood Boundaries, Social Disorganisation and Social 
> Exclusion, 2001-2002, R. Atkinson, focus groups
> SN 1670 -Coping Responses to Marital Violence : a Longitudinal Study 
> of Women Who Sought Help From a Refuge, 1976-1980, J. Pahl, semi- and 
> un-structured interviews, and longitudinal study design
> SN 4943 -Mothers and Daughters : Accounts of Health in the 
> Grandmother Generation, 1945-1978 , M. Blaxter, semi-structured.
> 
> 2. Partially pre-analysed materials (in process)
> 
> It's often difficult to compress all steps of the research process 
> (e.g., design, interview, transcribe, code, analyse, report) into the 
> time allotted. This is especially so in short courses, or when 
> qualitative methods are being taught as only one part of a course. 
> This teaching pack assumes that some of these exercises are 
> separable. That is, the students can learn data collection skills on 
> their own material, but do analysis on other, secondary material.
> 
> The second teaching pack will use Qualidata materials to illustrate 
> the progression of analysis, for example, from descriptive analysis 
> to explanatory analysis. Tools will include several tables, showing 
> the transition from typologies to patterns of association. They 
> tables could be partially filled in (to provide a demo to students) 
> with other bits left blank (as in class exercises).
> 
> One of the datasets to be used will be Annette Lawson's study of 
> adultery. In part, one of the things she needed to establish was 
> "what is adultery?" with elements such as knowledge of spouse, 
> duration of the relationshop, and physical involvement all being 
> critical criteria in interviewees' definition. The material helps 
> reveal assumptions researchers must address when doing even "simple" 
> coding and analysis.
> 
> This collection can also be used for rich discussions of the 
> procedures necessary to get informed consent. As the content for the 
> interviews was highly sensitive, this research illustrates that 
> informed consent is possible even with sensitive materials.
> 
> 3. Exemplar data in the CAQDAS Networking Project (in use)
> 
> Another type of teaching material in use is data that has been 
> provided to the CAQDAS Networking Project for use in workshops. The 
> collection is Mildred Blaxter's Mothers and Daughters.  The tool 
> being used is Atlas.ti and the research project is secondary analysis 
> on convenience foods. Coding refinement and use of sub-samples are 
> just some of the techniques of secondary analysis enabled by CAQDAS 
> tools.
> 
> Thanks to: Ann Lewins, Jane Elliott, Karen O' Reilly, Pirjo Nuutinen, 
> John Flood, Gail Wilson, Elizabeth Bishop.
> -- 
> =========================================================================
> Edmund Chattoe: Department of Sociology, University of Oxford, Manor Road
> Oxford, OX1 3UQ tel: 01865-286174 fax: 01865-286171 Review Editor Journal
> of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation (JASSS) "So act as to 
> treat humanity, whether in your own person or in another, always as 
> an end, and
> never as only a means." (Immanuel Kant, Fundamental Principles)  Nuffield
> Foundation New Career  Development Fellow and  Research Fellow,  Nuffield
> College. More data here http://www.sociology.ox.ac.uk/people/chattoe.html
> =========================================================================

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