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CONTAMINATED-LAND-STRATEGIES  August 2018

CONTAMINATED-LAND-STRATEGIES August 2018

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Subject:

Re: unknown map symbol - possible contaminants on vegetable plots

From:

Ann Barker <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Ann Barker <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 3 Aug 2018 16:50:37 +0000

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Hi Colin, 
 
You are absolutely right, and if this was a 20th century allotment site I would anticipate arsenic, PAHs, asbestos, herbicides, pesticides, hydrocarbons of all sorts (including creosote etc.).  I'll add lead to the list.  However, in the 1850s,  I would presume that access to new-fangled chemicals for your average market gardener might have been more limited and that things like arsenic based pesticides and sulphur etc may have been in use.   
 
Best regards, 
 
Ann 
 
Ann Barker 
Lead Officer Contaminated Land 
Environmental Health 
 
Tel: 01274 431147   
Email [log in to unmask] 
 
City of Bradford Metropolitan District Council 
Department of Health and Wellbeing, 5th Floor, Britannia House, Broadway, Bradford, BD1 1HX  
 
“Working Together to Deliver Better Health and Better Lives” 
 
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-----Original Message----- 
From: Contaminated Land Management Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Colin Green 
Sent: 03 August 2018 15:26 
To: [log in to unmask] 
Subject: unknown map symbol - possible contaminants on vegetable plots 
 
Hi Anne 
High lead is also often found on allotments. The source is ash from burned wood that had previously been painted. A lot of wood was primed with lead based paint.  
 
I did the analysis (using XRF) of several school playing fields in the London area. An initial SI showed very high lead. The lead was in a distinct layer of ash and rubble.  This was from the remains of bomb damaged buildings during WW2 and had been used to fill in the dip in the field many years ago. It was easy to see the ash layer. The soil just above and below was lead free. The source was again lead based paint used to preserve and prime wood and metal. 
 
Another source, if close to a road was from traffic, when lead was in petrol. I measure over 600 mg/kg lead on numerous roadsides and allotments where they were right next to a main road. The lead slowly settles to about 50 cm below the surface (worm action? and rainfall) 
 
Having seen the amount of plastic being burned on allotments, I do wonder about the dioxin concentrations. Better not go there though........ 
 
Have a good weekend everyone. It looks like another sunny one 
 
Regards 
 
Colin 
 
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