JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for CHILDLORE Archives


CHILDLORE Archives

CHILDLORE Archives


CHILDLORE@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

CHILDLORE Home

CHILDLORE Home

CHILDLORE  April 2012

CHILDLORE April 2012

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Matthew Grenby Speaking on 'The Child Reader', Mon 14 May

From:

Mary Guyatt <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

The Children's Folklore Mailing List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 30 Apr 2012 11:54:13 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (27 lines)

**Please note that if you press the Reply button to respond to this mailing, it will be distributed to everyone on the Childlore List.  If you want to make a personal reply, you will need to modify the Reply-To line of your message.**

‘The Child Reader and the Birth of Children’s Literature, 1700-1840’
Dr Matthew Grenby, Newcastle University

Monday 14 May 2012, V&A Museum of Childhood, 17.30-19.00

Children's literature, it is often said, was an invention of the  
eighteenth century. But who owned and read these new books, where did  
they get them, and what sort - and how many - of them were they likely  
to own? Moreover, how did these young people actually use this  
new-fangled product, and what did they think of it? Since children  
leave so few reliable records of their lives these are all difficult  
questions to answer. But by combining many unused and unusual kinds of  
evidence - inscriptions, marginalia, journals, letters, portraits, and  
the contents of the books themselves - it has been possible to  
discover much about this first generation of readers of children's  
literature, and, from this, to say with much more certainty how  
children's literature began.

Talks are free but booking is recommended. Telephone 020 8983 5205.
Directions to the venue on www.museumofchildhood.org.uk


The Child in the World programme is organised by the V&A Museum of  
Childhood in collaboration with Queen Mary, University of London. See  
www.geog.qmul.ac.uk/research/childintheworld for further details.

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JISCMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
June 2012
April 2012
March 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
September 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
June 2008
April 2008
March 2008
December 2007
November 2007
June 2007
April 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001


WWW.JISCMAIL.AC.UK

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager