JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for CARIBBEAN-STUDIES Archives


CARIBBEAN-STUDIES Archives

CARIBBEAN-STUDIES Archives


CARIBBEAN-STUDIES@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

CARIBBEAN-STUDIES Home

CARIBBEAN-STUDIES Home

CARIBBEAN-STUDIES  July 2018

CARIBBEAN-STUDIES July 2018

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

FW: HG Seminar - Mala Jokhan - July 11th, 10am - 11pm, Geography 311

From:

Patricia Noxolo <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Patricia Noxolo <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 9 Jul 2018 07:26:05 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (59 lines)

Dear colleagues,

See below.

All the best,
Pat


Dr Patricia Noxolo,

Senior Lecturer in Human Geography

School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences,

University of Birmingham,

Edgbaston,

Birmingham

B15 2TT

UK

________________________________
From: Natasha Cornea (Geography)
Sent: 09 July 2018 08:19
To: GEES All Staff; [log in to unmask]; [log in to unmask]
Cc: Mala Jokhan
Subject: HG Seminar - Mala Jokhan - July 11th, 10am - 11pm, Geography 311

Dear all,

Mala Jokhan from the University of the West Indies will visiting the UK this week. We have invited her to present her research as part of the HG Seminar series in Geography 311 from 10:00-11:00 am on July 11th.

Dr Jokhan is an instructor in Sociology at the University of the West Indies, St Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago.  Her broad research interests align well with those of many in HG including an interest in transnational migration, poverty and unemployment, and childhood and youth. She will present research on: Exploring social constructs of the term "child left behind": A cross-cultural analysis of the context of migrant families. (abstract below).

Please also share with those outside of the department who may be interested.

Best wishes,


Dr Natasha Cornea
Lecturer in Human Geography
GEES | University of Birmingham B15 2TT


ABSTRACT
The separation that children and their primary caregivers may experience as a consequence of parental migration is a phenomenon which has been experienced by families globally. A continuous struggle for better opportunities and livelihoods may encourage economic providers to look beyond the local in the hope of their entire families migrating over time and reunifying abroad (in the case of international migration) or in urban areas (in the case of internal migration). While the phenomenon appears to be the same in terms of the nature and length of separation prior to reunification, it seems that there are different ways in which the practice is locally conceptualized and evaluated. For purposes of this study, in order to explore the social constructs of children left behind as a consequence of migration, reference is made to Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, Grenada, Africa, China and India.

Using a comparative approach, a cross-cultural analysis of migrant families reveals that there seems to be a distinct culture of parental migration in the case of the Caribbean and the term “barrel children” is quite commonly used among Caribbean migrant families to refer to children awaiting their migrant parents. In the case of China, the term “liushou” for the left behind has made it into public discourse and even policy making to describe the plight of the rural children who grow up separated from one or both parents while these migrate long-term and long-distance to cities for work. However, for migrant households interviewed in India, there seems to be no conceptualization whatever of children or wives being “left behind” in rural areas while male migrants move to cities for work, and consequently no term as such has emerged.
By exploring the macro contexts of the case study countries and through the study of the social, economic and historical backgrounds of selected micro contexts, variations in parent-child separation are explored. As a result, the paper argues that these variations indicate the social construct of the concept “children left behind”. The data reveals that the national, demographic, cultural and socio-economic contexts that characterize migrant families play a major role in formulating understanding of variations in how children separated from their parent(s) as a result of migration are described and perceived.
Keywords: social constructs, children left behind, cross-cultural analysis, migrant families


########################################################################

To unsubscribe from the CARIBBEAN-STUDIES list, click the following link:
https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?SUBED1=CARIBBEAN-STUDIES&A=1

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager