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BSA-WORK-EMPLOYMENT-ECONOMICLIFE  July 2018

BSA-WORK-EMPLOYMENT-ECONOMICLIFE July 2018

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Subject:

New Issue: Human Resource Management Journal Vol 28, Issue 3

From:

Dora Scholarios <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Dora Scholarios <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 13 Jul 2018 12:58:12 +0000

Content-Type:

multipart/related

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text/plain (1 lines) , image001.png (1 lines)

** Apologies for any cross-posting ** 
 
We are excited to share with you the latest issue of Human Resource Management Journal. 
 
This includes a provocation by Tony Dundon and Anthony Rafferty on The (potential) demise of HRM? accompanied by a short video synopsis of the main propositions: Video Abstract<https://vimeo.com/266834510>. Also included are articles on agency workers and freelancers, talent status awareness, women engineers, and a number of papers on leadership, including its effect on commitment and engagement, as well as leadership in global teams. 
 
We also announce a new Call for Papers for a Special Issue on The Role of HRM in Refugee Workforce Integration See the full details of the Call for Papers <https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/pb-assets/assets/17488583/CFP%20Refugee%20Workforce%20Integration.pdf> 
 
Finally, we're delighted to report the continued increase in our Impact Factor to 2.343; Ranking: 4/27 in Industrial Relations & Labor; 83/209 in Management 
 
Regards,
Elaine Farndale, Anthony McDonnell, Dora Scholarios and Adrian Wilkinson 
Editors-in-Chief, Human Resource Management Journal 
 
 
 
 
Human Resource Management Journal 
Impact Factor: 2.343; Ranking: 4/27 in Industrial Relations & Labor; 83/209 in Management 
5 Year Impact Factor: 3.100 
 
Special Issue - Call for Papers 
 
The Role of HRM in Refugee Workforce Integration 
Guest Editors: Luciara Nardon, Betina Skudlarek, Soo Min Toh 
Submission Period: April 1st – April 30th 2019 
See the full details of the Call for Papers here<https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/pb-assets/assets/17488583/CFP%20Refugee%20Workforce%20Integration.pdf> 
 
 
Latest Issue, Volume 28, Issue 3: 
 
The latest issue of the Human Resource Management Journal is now available and includes a provocation paper, and accompanying video abstract, on ‘The (potential) demise of HRM’. 
 
Full Issue Table of Contents available below: 
 
Volume 28, Issue 3, July 2018, Pages 377-509 
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/17488583/2018/28/3 
For a list of the Issue’s articles, see accompanying abstracts and article information below: 
 
Provocation Paper: 
 
The (potential) demise of HRM? 
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1748-8583.12195 
Video Abstract: https://vimeo.com/266834510 
Tony Dundon, Anthony Rafferty 
This article seeks to provoke that human resource management (HRM), both as an academic field of study and as a form of professional practice, is at risk of impoverishment. The main reasoning for this is because of ideological individualism and marketisation with an attendant neglect on wider organisational, employee, and societal concerns. Following a review of the context of financialised capitalism, three contemporary developments in HRM are used to illustrate the argument: reward strategies, talent management, and high performance work systems. Implications for the practice of HRM and the way the subject area is taught in mainstream business schools are considered. 
 
Original Articles: 
 
Can leadership compensate for deficient inclusiveness in global virtual teams? 
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1748-8583.12184 
Jakob Lauring, Charlotte Jonasson 
Although the number of global virtual teams has been growing rapidly, it is still a great challenge to achieve internal collaboration across geographic, cultural, and linguistic barriers. Two factors that have been identified to improve productivity are inclusive group attitudes in the team and the right leadership from the team leader. Although there are strong indications that each of these concepts would have a favourable effect on team member performance, we set out to explore how they function in combination. More specifically, we hypothesise that inspirational motivation from a team leader can compensate for a lack of inclusive group attitudes in the form of team openness to language diversity. We also predict the positive effects of “inspirational motivation” leadership to be stronger than those of the “management by exception” style of leadership. Using responses from 174 team members and their 23 team leaders in the research and development department of a Danish manufacturing organisation, we confirm our hypotheses. This provides clear guidelines for HRM interventions in organisations using global virtual teams. 
 
Relative deprivation of temporary agency workers in the public sector: The role of public service motivation and the possibility of standard employment 
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1748-8583.12186 
Heung‐Jun Jung, Sung‐Chul Noh, Ilju Kim 
Although public service organisations have increasingly relied on nonstandard employees, little research has investigated their work experiences and job attitudes. This paper examines the mechanism by which temporary agency workers' experience of relative deprivation affects their organisational attachment toward their client firm in the public sector. Based on data collected from temporary help agencies working with an international airport in Korea, we found that the perceived likelihood of standard employment mediated the negative relationship of relative deprivation to organisational attachment. Moreover, the indirect relationship of relative deprivation with organisational attachment via perceived likelihood of standard employment was strong and significant among those with high public service motivation but was not significant for those with low public service motivation. We discuss the implications of this study in building a better understanding of relative deprivation and nonstandard work arrangements in the public sector. 
 
Are freelancers a breed apart? The role of protean and boundaryless career attitudes in employability and career success 
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1748-8583.12188 
Alessandro Lo Presti, Sara Pluviano, Jon P. Briscoe 
Recent economic and organisational changes have fostered an increasing diversification of the workforce, among whom freelancers are an under‐represented population in the literature. This study aimed at examining the role of protean and boundaryless career, professional commitment, and employability activities in fostering freelancers' subjective career success. Data were collected via an online survey among a sample of 425 Italian freelancers and analysed through structural equation modelling. Results partially confirmed several hypotheses: higher self‐directed career management and boundaryless mindset predicted higher employability activities and professional commitment; moreover, employability and professional commitment acted as mediators between career attitudes and subjective career success. The study provides support for the importance of such variables to freelancers' career success, as well as for the significance of protean and boundaryless careers among nontraditional occupational groups. Interventions aimed at fostering such attitudes could support freelancers in improving their attainment of professional progress and perception of career success. 
 
Talent responses to talent status awareness—Not a question of simple reciprocation 
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1748-8583.12190 
Mats Ehrnrooth, Ingmar Björkman, Kristiina Mäkelä, Adam Smale, Jennie Sumelius, Susanna Taimitarha 
How to manage talent effectively is a key question in organisations. Yet we still know relatively little about talent's psychological reactions to their exclusive status. Based on psychological contract theory and research on status, this study analyses a sample of 321 employees identified as talent by their organisations, only some of whom were aware of their exclusive talent status. The results provide evidence that talent status awareness moderates the relationship between a range of employer inducements and talent obligations, such that it increases the importance of some inducements while diminishing that of others. The study contributes to the talent management literature by isolating specific effects of talent status awareness and calling into question extant evidence of its direct positive effects on talent attitudes. The findings also have implications for talent status communication, talent management, and future theorising of talent reactions to their exclusive status. 
 
The role of management and trade union leadership on dual commitment: The mediating effect of the workplace relations climate 
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1748-8583.12191 
Chloe Fortin‐Bergeron, Olivier Doucet, Marc‐Antonin Hennebert 
This article examines the effect of transformational and laisser‐faire leadership on the part of local union leaders and immediate supervisors on the dual commitment of unionised workers. Building on the social information processing perspective, it is suggested that these leadership styles are linked to commitment through the workplace relations climate (WRC). Based on a sample of 834 unionised workers, our results suggest that WRC represents an important mechanism explaining the effect of the immediate supervisor's leadership in unionised settings. Results also show that transformational leadership on the part of union representatives is positively linked to union and organisational commitment. This article contributes to the WRC and dual commitment literatures by going beyond structural and institutional explanations and considering relational and actor‐related variables, such as leadership styles. 
 
What helps? Women engineers' accounts of staying on 
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1748-8583.12192 
Dulini Fernando, Laurie Cohen, Joanne Duberley 
We have considerable understanding of the obstacles that women engineers encounter and the reasons that they leave the field, but we know less about what enables them to remain. Adopting an interpretivist approach, this article examines how a group of British women engineers in two FTSE 100 companies account for “staying on” in their male‐dominated work settings. We delineate four specific forms of help that facilitate women's retention in the field. We argue that exposure to help leads to women developing a habitus that enables them to continue working in engineering. To conclude, we draw on our findings to outline HR practices that will facilitate supportive relationships in the workplace and pave the way towards developing more positive organisational climates. 
 
How supervisory support for career development relates to subordinate work engagement and career outcomes: The moderating role of task proficiency 
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1748-8583.12194 
Fu Yang, Jun Liu, Xiaoyu Huang, Jing Qian, Ting Wang, Zhen Wang, Huiping Yu 
Drawing on conservation of resources theory, this research investigates how and when supervisory support for career development relates to subordinate career outcomes. Using data collected from 228 supervisor–subordinate dyads across 3 phases, we proposed and examined a mediated moderation model in which the interaction between supervisory support for career development and task proficiency was mediated by work engagement in predicting career outcomes in terms of career satisfaction and promotability. Results showed that supervisory support for career development was positively related to career satisfaction and promotability. Results also supported the mediated moderation model. We outlined the theoretical contributions for future research and discussed the practical implications. 
 
John Wiley & Sons Limited is a private limited company registered in England with registered number 641132. Registered office address: The Atrium, Southern Gate, Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom. PO19 8SQ. 
 
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