JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS Archives


ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS Archives

ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS Archives


ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS Home

ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS Home

ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS  August 2018

ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS August 2018

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Call for Papers "Forced migration, Exclusion, and Social Class"

From:

Magdalena Suerbaum <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Magdalena Suerbaum <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 9 Aug 2018 10:39:11 +0200

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (158 lines)

Dear subscribers,

please find a CFP for the two-day workshop "Forced Migration, Exclusion,
and Social Class" on 23/24 May 2019 in Halle, Germany.

http://web.eth.mpg.de/data_export/events/7483/CfP_WiMi_Workshop_on_Class_and_Forced_Migration.pdf

ABSTRACT:

This workshop directs its attention to the interrelation between forced
migration, exclusion, and social class. In the literature on forced
migration, social class is often hidden behind other terms, when refugees
are described as “vulnerable” and “poor” or as “better off. A few studies
that do address class have recognised that a forced migrant remains a
‘classed’ person (Van Hear2004, 2014; McSpadden 1999: 251) and observed
that a middle- or upper-class background can ease the start in a host
country but also lead to sense of frustration and misrecognition (Kleist
2010: 198) and that a celebrated social status is not always transferrable
to the host country (Jansen 2008: 182).

Treating forced migrants as a homogeneous group with respect to class leads
to ignoring relevant differences that can help explain trajectories of
forced displacement and migrant integration. Furthermore, attention to the
class backgrounds of forced migrants can help us understand the
multi-layered nature of their social exclusion and inclusion in the host
country. Class background functions as an additional layer of selection and
differentiation, not only when fleeing the homeland but also after arrival
in the host country.

We understand forced migration as a process of movement compelled by
conflict, social and political oppression, and disaster, or induced by
development projects. Hence, forcedmigrants are “ordinary people” faced
with particular kinds of social, political, and historical situations
(Turton 2003: 1, see also Malkki 1995: 496). Exclusion refers to the
outcome of practices by state and non-state actors that restrict migrants’
access to territory, rights, andresources, as well as participation in
various societal spheres. This may entail practices of boundary-making
between migrant communities and across different social class backgrounds,
as well as acts of self-exclusion. Class may be approached in the sense
that Weber uses the term, i.e. referring to (market) opportunities based on
resources; this definition is also used in more recent class concepts (e.g.
Savage 2013). Following Bourdieu, this includes focusing on“ascribed social
class”, i.e. markers which are interpreted in certain ways by others
and theindividuals
themselves.

Both ascribed social class and class position in the Weberian sense often
change during forced displacement, simply due to the change of context.
While such changes are likely to be an anticipated or desired consequence
of other forms of migration, this is often not the case for forced
migration. We thus examine the degree to which markers of class and their
interpretation by others are subject to change during forced displacement
and how forced migrants experience their (different) class positions.

The workshop will address questions such as:

   -

   ●  How does class (whether defined in terms of profession, education, or
   property) influence experiences of forced migration?
   -

   ●  What can a focus on class contribute to the study of forced migration
   and how can the study of forced migration influence conceptualisations of
   class?
   -

   ●  How do we measure class and social mobility for forced migrants,
   taking into account their situations before, during, and after migration?
   What frame of reference can we use when speaking about social class and
   migration?
   -

   ●  How does the class background of forced migrants influence social
   exclusion and inclusion?
   -

   ●  How are migration routes, the choice of destination, the time spent
   travelling, and the possibility of return to the homeland related to a
   refugee’s class background?
   -

   ●  What is the relationship between social and spatial mobility?
   -

   ●  How do refugees deal with the “status paradox” (Nieswand 2014) of
   belonging to

   different classes in different places and at different times?
   -

   ●  How do refugees and asylum-seekers define markers of social class?
   What factors shape their self-image?
   -

   ●  And how do forced migrants who are put in the category of “refugee”
   perceive and dealwith this label?
   -

   ●  How does the class background of a forced migrant interact with
   his/her nationality,ethnicity, or religious belonging, particularly in
   relationship to the “majority society” (e.g.Pedersen 2012)?

   We welcome proposals from researchers working on various aspects of the
   overarching topic of forced migration, exclusion, and social class, as well
   as papers dealing with specific regional or temporal foci, including
   internal displacement. The format of the two-day workshop will centre
   around discussion of pre-circulated papers. We plan to prepare an edited
   volume or journal issue based on selected papers from the workshop.

   A keynote lecture will be given by Nicholas Van Hear (COMPAS, University
   of Oxford).

   Organizers:

   Christian Hunkler (MPI for Social Law and Social Policy), Tabea Scharrer
   (MPI for Social Anthropology), Magdalena Suerbaum (MPI for the Study of
   Religious and Ethnic Diversity), Zeynep Yanasmayan (MPI for Social
   Anthropology)

   Please submit your abstract by 15 October 2018 to both
   [log in to unmask] [log in to unmask]


-- 
Magdalena Suerbaum

PhD candidate
Centre for Gender Studies
SOAS, University of London
Thornhaugh St, Russell Sq
London WC1H OXG
United Kingdom

Tel: +20 101 132 8369
Email: [log in to unmask]

*************************************************************
*           Anthropology-Matters Mailing List
*  http://www.anthropologymatters.com            *
* A postgraduate project comprising online journal,    *
* online discussions, teaching and research resources  *
* and international contacts directory.               *
* To join this list or to look at the archived previous       *
* messages visit:                                             *
* https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/Anthropology-Matters   *
* If you have ALREADY subscribed: to send a message to all    *
* those currently subscribed to the list,just send mail to:   *
*        [log in to unmask]                  *
*                                                             *
*       Enjoyed the mailing list? Why not join the new        *
*       CONTACTS SECTION @ www.anthropologymatters.com        *
*    an international directory of anthropology researchers *

To unsubscribe please click here:
https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?SUBED1=ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS&A=1

***************************************************************

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager