JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS Archives


ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS Archives

ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS Archives


ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS Home

ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS Home

ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS  September 2018

ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS September 2018

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Inequalities of Aging by Elana D. Buch

From:

Rachel Shand <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Rachel Shand <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 4 Sep 2018 14:08:04 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (53 lines)

Dear ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS Subscribers,

We would like to announce a new publication from New York University Press, which we hope will be of interest.

Inequalities of Aging
Paradoxes of Independence in American Home Care
Elana D. Buch


http://www.combinedacademic.co.uk/inequalities-of-aging


“A compelling examination of homecare that looks at both workers’ and elder’s experiences. Homecare is a growing industry with profound impacts on the lives of older people and low income workers. This accessible ethnographic account shows how the cultural commitment to independence for older adults generates dependency and inequality in the lives of homecare workers. I look forward to teaching this book and talking about the issues it raises with my students.”--Jessica Mulligan, Providence College
"Inequalities of Aging is a brilliantly told story of precarious and unequal lives. Page by page we witness the haunting moral engagements of those bound together, care workers and older adults, and the pretense of independence that care workers bestow on those they care for. This inspired ethnography captures, close up, the mysterious nature of human relationships and places them in the context of tenacious social policies that devalue and underpay the care workforce."--Carol Stack, author of Call to Home: African Americans Reclaim the Rural South and All Our Kin
"Brilliant, illuminating, and wrenching, Buch’s extraordinary ethnography offers an intimate account of how the fate of older adults and the working poor who care for them are bound together, in a society that devalues both aging and care and is obsessed with independence. Penetrating and provocative, Inequalities of Aging makes a major contribution to the anthropology and sociology of aging, care work, and social inequality."--Sarah Lamb, author of White Saris and Sweet Mangoes and Successful Aging as a Contemporary Obsession
The troubling dynamic of the American home care industry where increased independence for the elderly conflicts with the well being of caregivers
Paid home care is one of the fastest growing occupations in the United States, and millions of Americans rely on these workers to help them remain at home as they grow older. However, the industry is rife with contradictions. The United States spends a fortune on medical care, yet devotes comparatively few resources on improving wages, thus placing home care providers in the ranks of the working poor. As a result, the work that enables some older Americans to live independently generates profound social inequalities.
Inequalities of Aging explores the ways in which these inequalities play out on the ground as workers, who are disproportionately women of color and immigrants, earn poverty-level wages and often struggle to provide for themselves and their families. The ethnographic narrative reveals how two of the nation’s most pressing concerns—rising social inequality and caring for an aging population—intersect to transform the lives of older adults, home care workers, and the world around them.
The book takes readers inside the homes and offices of people connected to two Chicago area home care agencies serving low-income and affluent older adults, respectively. Through intimate portrayals of daily life, Elana D. Buch illustrates how diverse histories, care practices, and social policies overlap and contribute to social inequality.
Illuminating the lived experience of both workers and their clients, Inequalities of Aging shows the different ways in which the idea of independence both connects and shapes the lives of the elderly and the working poor.
Elana D. Buch is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Iowa.
With all best wishes,

Combined Academic Publishers



New York University Press | Anthropologies of American Medicine: Culture, Power, and Practice | August 2018 | 288pp | 9781479807178 | PB | £22.99*
*Price subject to change.



*************************************************************
*           Anthropology-Matters Mailing List
*  http://www.anthropologymatters.com            *
* A postgraduate project comprising online journal,    *
* online discussions, teaching and research resources  *
* and international contacts directory.               *
* To join this list or to look at the archived previous       *
* messages visit:                                             *
* https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/Anthropology-Matters   *
* If you have ALREADY subscribed: to send a message to all    *
* those currently subscribed to the list,just send mail to:   *
*        [log in to unmask]                  *
*                                                             *
*       Enjoyed the mailing list? Why not join the new        *
*       CONTACTS SECTION @ www.anthropologymatters.com        *
*    an international directory of anthropology researchers *

To unsubscribe please click here:
https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?SUBED1=ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS&A=1

***************************************************************

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager