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ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS  May 2018

ANTHROPOLOGY-MATTERS May 2018

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Subject:

CfP - Extended deadline - Normativity in Situated and Embodied Cognition

From:

David Eubelen <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

David Eubelen <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 8 May 2018 13:31:06 +0200

Content-Type:

text/plain

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text/plain (133 lines)

** apologies for cross-posting


ABSTRACT SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED UNTIL 15TH OF MAY, 2018


Dear Colleagues,



We would like to draw your attention to a CfP (below) for the 5th
 edition of the workshop TRACE
<https://sites.google.com/site/workshoptrace/home> that will be
hosted by the Université Libre de Bruxelles, 27-28June 2018!


The aim of this annual workshop is to bring together
participants from different scientific disciplines and
foster an interdisciplinary discussion about embodied and
situated approaches to cognition in the broad sense
of the term. This year, we will discuss the issue of *normativity*
 that lies at the core of any situated and embodied definition of cognition.



We strongly encourage master students, PhD students and
postdoctoral researchers to submit a proposal. We will be
happy to receive a wide range of contributions from anthropologists!

Abstract submission will close 15th may, 2018.

Please don't hesitate to spread the call through your networks.

Best wishes,



David Eubelen, Université Libre de Bruxelles

Corentin Chanet, Université Libre de Bruxelles



(https://sites.google.com/site/workshoptrace/home)



*Normativity in Situated and Embodied Cognition*



*Abstract*



It has long been recognized in cognitive science that agents - artificial
ones as well as living organisms - cannot be understood outside of their
embodied and situated nature, and that they should be studied as some
philosophers have referred to as ‘being in the world’. Despite differing
views, many contemporary approaches to cognition and perception (such as
ecological psychology, sensorimotor theory, enactivism and extended mind)
agree on this matter. Yet with this joint agreement come other subjects to
dispute, with among others the issue of normativity, i.e. the origin,
diversity and distribution of the norms regulating the interactions between
agents and their environments.



Through approaching normativity, we wish to go further than the idea of an
agent being always related to its environment and vice versa; we aim to
generate in-depth discussions on how to measure, observe and model
concretely the co-constitutive spatio-temporalities of these norms, from
attentional saliences to biosocial forces that continuously inform and
shape both agents and their surroundings. To this end we hence seek to
raise fundamental questions methodologically and theoretically.



For instance, in what ways do agents constitute their own world? To what
extent is it constituted by others? How does it show through within the
study of cognition in laboratory and in ‘the wild’? What are the cognitive,
perceptual and behavioural conditions that guarantee the relative unity of
‘a world’? Should we think of the environment primarily as a set of
features, a system of processes or a semi-closed network of activities? In
which circumstances should we think of autonomy as the ability to adapt to
environmental changes or as the ability to produce them? Is meaning derived
solely from the satisfaction of an agent’s internal constraints? What makes
a norm overarches an agent’s behaviour or a whole situation? In which
conditions can normative pluralism lead to cognitive dissonance? Is
normative pluralism compatible with a monist definition of norms or should
multiple kinds of norms be analytically distinguished (biological,
psychological, social or cultural, etc.)?



(more: https://sites.google.com/site/workshoptrace/home)




--------------------------------
David Eubelen
PhD Student - Assistant
Laboratoire d'Anthropologie des Mondes Contemporains
<http://lamc.ulb.ac.be/>

ULB - Institut de Sociologie
44 avenue Jeanne - CP 124 - 1050 Brussels
Office: S12.125
Tel.: +32 2 650 46 92 - Fax.: +32 2 650 43 37
Email: [log in to unmask]

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